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Upcoming Events

weekly calendar academic opportunities

Past Events

  • Turkish Flagship Bazaar

    Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 4:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 1050. Come learn about study abroad in Turkey! Learn some Turkish phrases, make Turkish jewelry, try Turkish desserts, play backgammon, and more! If you have any questions, please inquire by email to turk@indiana.edu.
  • Anna-Maria Peltomaki, "Teaching Finnish as a Foreign Language at the Beginner Level"

    Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 5:30pm. Global & International Studies Building 0011. Central Eurasian Studies Job Talk. Anna-Maria Peltomaki, a candidate for CEUS Finnish Language Instructor, will present, "Teaching Finnish as a Foreign Language at the Beginner Level."
  • Institute for European Studies Annual Valentine's Day Bake Off

    Wednesday, February 10, 2016, 1:30pm. Global & International Studies Building 4067. The Institute for European Studies invites you to its Annual Valentine's Day Bake Off. Bring your favorite dessert to share! Prizes will be awarded to the best entries. If you would like to enter a dessert, please email EURO at euroinst@indiana.edu by Friday, February 5.
  • Application Deadline: NFMLTA-NCOLCTL Research Award

    Wednesday, February 10, 2016. The NCOLCTL invites proposals for NFMLTA - NCOLCTL Research Award in the fields of applied linguistics and language education with small grants aimed primarily at the graduate students at the dissertation data-gathering and writing stages. The purpose of the grants is to provide resources to support research in the field of second language teaching and learning of less commonly taught languages (all languages except English, Spanish, French, and German). The award amount is $500. Awardees will need to join the NCOLCTL. The awards will be conferred at the Walton Award Dinner (a part of the annual NCOLCTL conference) on Saturday, April 23 at the Holiday Inn & Suites Atlanta Airport-North, GA. The awardees are strongly encouraged to attend this event.
  • Jody Madeira and Basia Andraka-Christou (IU), "In vitro Fertilization: Politics and Law in Poland"

    Thursday, February 11, 2016, 4:00pm. Baier Hall (Maurer School of Law) 124. Lecture, Discussion, and Reception. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Barbara Mann (Jewish Theological Seminary, NY), "Makom: The Place of Space in Jewish Cultures"

    Thursday, February 11, 2016, 7:30pm. Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union. Barbara Mann is Associate Professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. The author of Space and Place in Jewish Studies (Rutgers University Press, 2012) and A Place in History: Modernism, Tel Aviv and the Creation of Jewish Urban Space (Stanford University Press, 2005), Mann was previously a member of the faculty in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University, and has held visiting fellowships at the University of Michigan and at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Recent work continues to address the role of memory in Israel-Palestine; her current research concerns the relation between Jewish writing and material culture. Mann has taught and shared her work in a variety of academic and community settings, and her lectures feature an array of text and image to engage audiences in thoughtful, critical discussion. This is the 2016 Samuel & Lillian Solotkin Memorial Lecture in Jewish Studies and Keynote Address for the 4th annual JSGSA Conference "Kissing the Mezuzah: Jewish Between Public and Private Space." This event is free and open to the public. If you have a disability and need assistance, arrangements can be made to accommodate most needs. Please contact iujsp@indiana.edu.
  • JSGSA Fourth Annual Conference, "Kissing the Mezuzah: Jews Between Public and Private Space"

    Thursday and Friday, February 11-12, 2016. Indiana Memorial Union. This conference will explore the ways in which Judaism and Jewishness have been, and continue to be negotiated with respect to space and place. We welcome submissions on topics as diverse as architecture, urban spaces, and sites of memory; textual and linguistic spaces, translations, and dialect; gender, sexuality, and the body; geography, migration, and exploration; the mapping of intellectual and academic spaces; and religious and ethnic identities. What does it mean for a space to be Jewish? How do we construct, mark, contest, or negotiate the borders, walls, and boundaries of Jewish and non-Jewish spaces? How is Jewishness performed within these spaces? We are seeking imaginative and innovative submissions from graduate students and recent Ph.D. graduates that define, expand, or challenge the existing boundaries of Jewish space in all its forms. This conference is designed to encompass a wide range of academic disciplines producing a sustained and focused conversation about space and place in the Jewish world, both past and present. The conference will feature a keynote address given by Dr. Barbara Mann, Associate Professor of Jewish Literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary, on Thursday evening and will otherwise involve themed panels of graduate students grouped according to research interests. Authors will deliver a 20-minute paper with response and questions at the end of each panel.
  • IU Preparing Future Faculty Conference, “Focus on the Future: Opportunities and Challenges in the Next Generation University"

    Friday, February 12, 2016, 8:30am - 5:00pm. Indiana Memorial Union. The PFF conference is a one-day professionalization event designed to provide graduate students from all disciplines and at all phases of their educations with important information about preparing for their future academic careers. This year the conference will consist of four sessions (three panels and one round table) addressing different issues of concern to graduate students. Topics will range from navigating the job market, to issues in teaching and pedagogy, to exploring the variety of professional opportunities available inside (and outside) of academia, among other subjects. Visit our website for more information and to view the program. The conference is free and open to all Indiana University graduate students, but please register here early for the free lunch. Limited space is available for the luncheon, and registration closes Monday, February 8. Contact Annalise Loehr (aloehr@indiana.edu) for more information.
  • Nadezhda Filimonova (Russian State Hydrometeoroloigcal University), "Arctic Geopolitics: The Russian Perspective on China’s and India’s Roles in the Far North"

    Friday, February 12, 2016, 12:15pm. Global & International Studies Building 4067. In recent years development of the Arctic region has increasingly concerned both Arctic (Russia, Canada, the United States, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Iceland) and non-Arctic countries (China, India, South Korea and Singapore). The growing attention to the region reflects its scientific significance and economic potential; the Arctic offers opportunities for exploitation of hydrocarbon deposits and navigation along the Northern Sea Route (NSR). This presentation will provide an overview of the Russian and Asian states’ interests and policy in the Far North and will examine future directions for these countries to collaborate in various areas by identifying mutual interests, actors, possible challenges and effects of cooperation on the policies of these states in the Arctic region. Nadezhda Filimonova currently heads the World Meteorological Organization Relations Department at the Russian State Hydrometeorological University in St. Petersburg. In the past she has worked in Sweden at both universities and governmental agencies. She has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including most recently in 2016 the Fulbright Scholarship for Russian International Education Administrators. Her research addresses international cooperation and competition for access to resources in the Arctic with a focus on Russia’s presence in the High North. Filimonova holds two Masters Degrees: one in Political Science and International Studies from Uppsala University and the other in International Relations from St. Petersburg State University. Sponsors: REEI, School of Education. Persons who need assistance to attend this event, should contact the REEI offices at reei@indiana.edu or 812-855-7309.
  • Workshop in Methods presents Dr. Christena Nippert-Eng (IU), "Watching Closely: Reflections of the Methods of Direct Observation"

    Friday, February 12, 2016, 2:00pm. Social Science Research Commons Grand Hall (Woodburn Hall 200). Ethnographers rely on three related activities to conduct research in the field: observation, conversation, and participation. Observing others in their environments and using this data to inform and share conclusions is an essential part of any fieldworker’s toolkit. Of these three activities, ethnographers’ observational muscles tend to be their weakest. In this talk, Christena Nippert-Eng offers her own contribution to the strengthening of direct observation research based on her recent book, Watching Closely: A Guide to Ethnographic Observation (Oxford, Nov 2015). The book includes nine exercises for practicing observational skills, including a preparatory briefing and post-exercise discussion. A companion website includes sample responses to each exercise from previous students, who practiced by observing Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo gorillas. Nippert-Eng hopes to encourage the use of more creative ways of collecting and analyzing data, such as sketching, diagramming, and photography, while helping fieldworkers develop more concrete expectations for the potential uses and meanings of ethnographic data. The goal is for ethnographers to not only strengthen their core skills, mindset, and creativity, but also to produce research that is more scientifically rigorous and persuasive.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: 31st Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference

    Friday, February 12, 2016. We invite graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars from a broad range of disciplines to submit proposals on any topic concerning the Middle East and Islamic world from the advent of Islam to the present day. Disciplinary focuses include but are not limited to: history, sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, literature, philosophy, art history, cinema and media studies, gender studies, and diaspora studies. As in previous years, two of our sponsors are offering limited funding to support special panels in the following fields: (1) modern Arabic literature and (2) Central Eurasian studies. Participants chosen for one of these panels may be eligible for a modest travel subsidy. Those interested should submit their abstracts with a note indicating their interest in being a part of one of these sponsored panels. Applicants not placed on a special panel will still receive full consideration for the general conference.
  • Application Deadline: John H. Edwards Fellowship

    Friday, February 12, 2016.

    The John H. Edwards Trust Fund will provide income for 3 fellowships of approximately $20,000 each for graduate students at Indiana University in academic year 2015-2016. The John H. Edwards Fellowship is one of the University’s most prestigious academic awards. A university-wide committee selects the fellows from nominations made by the deans of all departments and professional schools within the University that award terminal graduate degrees.

    In accordance with the bequest, the John H. Edwards Fellowship will be awarded on the following basis:

      Good citizenship, character, especially attitude toward public service and the likelihood of future usefulness to society, scholastic ability, intellectual capacity, and upon such other bases and qualifications, and in such manner, as the Trustees of Indiana University in their discretion and judgment may determine from time to time, but always without regard to consideration of religion, creed, race, national origin, color, sex, or political affiliation.

    The Edwards Trust Fund Committee interprets the above paragraph as an instruction to nominate a candidate with an extraordinary record of voluntary public service, exemplary character, superior scholastic ability, and intellectual capacity that promises dividends for society. Consistent with University policy, nominations for this award should be made without regard to sexual orientation or disability.

  • Viktor Shenderovich of Ekho Moskvy in Indianapolis

    Saturday, February 13, 2016. Park Tudor School Lecture Hall, 7200 North College Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. 13 февраля в 7ч.вечера в Park Tudor School (Lecture Hall) - 7200 North College Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46240 состоится встреча "Особое мнение" с Виктором Шендеровчем в Индианаполисе". Самый яркий и бесстрашный публицист, писатель-сатирик Виктор Шендерович поделится своим видением картины мира, проанализирует политическую ситуацию в России и США, выскажется о своих взглядах на перспективы развития мирового сообщества и ответит на любые вопросы. Билеты у входа $30 или на интернете: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/21180627828. Надеемся скоро увидеться. Ваши Индивстречи (Indy Vstrechi | indyvstrechi@gmail.com)
  • Application Deadline: Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, "New Directions in the Use of Oral Testimonies: Soviet Experiences of the Holocaust"

    Sunday, February 14, 2016. The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum invites applications for a workshop focused on the use of testimony in the study of the Holocaust in the former Soviet Union, to be held from August 1-12, 2016 at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. This workshop will bring together scholars whose work relies heavily upon oral and written testimonies of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims of the Holocaust on the territory of the former Soviet Union. Participants from North America and the states of the former Soviet Union will discuss research strategies and some of the central issues surrounding the use of testimonies in their work. Discussions will be prompted by pre-circulated synopses of participants’ research agendas, with a focus on their application of testimony to their wider projects. During the workshop, participants also will have the opportunity to engage with the many thousands of oral history testimonies available at the Museum, which include those of the USC Shoah Foundation and Yahad-In Unum. These records are but part of the Museum’s more than 210 million pages of archival material, which includes more than 15 million pages of microfilmed, digitized, and paper documents from the former Soviet Union. The program will culminate in a public presentation by the participants, in which they will discuss current issues and future directions in the use of testimony in research and in the teaching of the topic of the Holocaust in the former Soviet Union.
  • Dr. Frances Trix (IU), "Working with Refugees on the Syrian Refugee Trail: Strategic Camps in Eastern Europe"

    Monday, February 15, 2016, 12:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 3067. As winter falls, women and children compose an increasingly higher percentage of the Middle Eastern refugees on the refugee trail to Western Europe. What dangers and fears threaten refugees crossing from Turkey through Greece and the Balkans to Germany? What roles do governments, large international agencies, and local NGOs play in the refugee camps on the way? What are “strategic camps”? Who is being excluded? Dr. Trix recently returned from Macedonia, where she assisted Syrian, Iraqi, and Afghan refugees in refugee camps. She previously worked with Bosnian and Kosovar refugees from the Balkan wars of the 1990s. She has long conducted research in Muslim communities in the US, Turkey, and the Balkans. A speaker of Turkish, Albanian, colloquial Arabic, French, and some Macedonian, she has also taught, researched, and lived in Lebanon, Yemen, and Syria. She is Professor Emerita of Linguistics and Anthropology at IUB. This event is sponsored by the Institute for European Studies, the Russian and East European Institute, and the Center for the Study of the Middle East.
  • Proposal Deadline: ASEEES 2016 Annual Convention

    Monday, February 15, 2016. One of the core activities of the Association is the annual convention. Held in the fall, the convention takes place each year in a different city and is generally hosted by one of the Association's regional affiliates. This international forum makes possible a broad exchange of information and ideas, stimulating further work and sustaining the intellectual vitality of the field. 2016 Convention Theme: "Global Conversations"
  • Application Deadline: REEI/Mellon Summer Pre-Dissertation Travel Grants

    Monday, February 15, 2016. REEI offers two grants to support research-related travel for preliminary dissertation field activities such as exploring potential research sites, archives, and other research resources, establishing institutional affiliations, and identifying and meeting with scholars, archivists and specialists. The grants are primarily intended for doctoral students who will apply in the next academic year for funding to conduct dissertation research abroad. Students who have reached the ABD stage and have formally begun dissertation research are not eligible for funding under this program. REEI/Mellon Endowment grants are limited to $2,000 per student, paid as a travel reimbursement.
  • Application Deadline (Summer 2016): Title VIII Funding for American Councils Language Programs

    Monday, February 15, 2016. U.S. citizens who have completed a Bachelor’s Degree and intend to pursue graduate studies, M.A. students, and Ph.D. candidates are eligible to receive Title VIII Fellowship support for participation in American Councils intensive language programs in Russia, Central Asia, the South Caucasus, the Balkans, Moldova, and Ukraine. Title VIII Fellowships are available for the following programs: Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (RLASP), Eurasian Regional Language Program (ERLP), and Balkan Language Initiative (BLI). The application deadline is February 15th for summer programs, and March 15th for fall and academic year programs. Please visit http://www.acstudyabroad.org/title-viii/ for more information or contact us via email at: outbound@americancouncils.org. American Councils staff are also glad to speak with you, your students, and your colleagues directly; we can be reached at (202) 833-7522.
  • Application Deadline: Kennan Institute Title VIII-Supported Short-Term Grant

    Monday, February 15, 2016. The Kennan Institute offers Title VIII Short-Term Grants to scholars whose research in the social sciences or humanities focuses on Russia Ukraine, and the countries of Eurasia, and who demonstrate a particular need to utilize the library, archival, and other specialized resources of the Washington, D.C. area. Policy-relevant research is preferred. Academic participants must either possess a doctoral degree or be doctoral candidates who have nearly completed their dissertations. For non-academics, an equivalent degree of professional achievement is expected. Title VIII Short-Term Grants provide a stipend of $3,200 for 31 days. While the Kennan Institute cannot provide an office for Short-Term scholars, we do provide a carrel with a computer and internet access. Travel and accommodation expenses are not directly covered by this grant. There is no official application form for Short-Term Grants. The applicant is requested to submit a concise description (700-800 words) of his or her research project (including a title), curriculum vitae, a statement on preferred dates of residence in Washington, D.C., and two letters of recommendation specifically in support of the research to be conducted at the Kennan Institute. Please note, the recommendation letters must be signed. Applicants should also state their citizenship status in their materials. All of these materials may be submitted via e-mail. Please note that the letters of recommendation, if sent by email, must be sent directly from the referee and be a scan of a signed letter. Referees are also welcome to send their signed letters by fax or post. Grant recipients are required to be in residence in Washington, D.C. for the duration of their grant. Two rounds of competitive selection for Short-Term Grants will be held in 2016. The next closing dates are February 15 and July 15, 2016. Applicants will be notified of the competition results roughly seven weeks after the closing date. Awardees must provide at least one month notification before beginning their grant. Only U.S. citizens are eligible for Title VIII Short-Term Grants.
  • Submission Deadline: Illini Journal of International Security

    Monday, February 15, 2016. The Illini Journal of International Security (IJOIS) is a peer-reviewed undergraduate academic journal that was founded in September 2015 by undergraduate students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. IJOIS is published biannually through the Program of Arms Control & Domestic and International Security (ACDIS) and is comprised of exceptional undergraduate and graduate papers on topics related to international security or foreign affairs. IJOIS utilizes a cross-disciplinary approach and accepts papers from students studying the social sciences, STEM fields, business and the humanities that analyze international security issues from innovative perspectives. While IJOIS is run by students at UIUC, the Journal accepts submissions from students at all University of Illinois campuses (Urbana-Champaign, Chicago, and Springfield).
  • EXTENDED Application Deadline: Graduate Student Exchanges to Poland (Jagiellonian University [Krakow] and Warsaw University)

    Monday, February 15, 2016. Indiana University offers exchange opportunities with top universities in selected countries for graduate students on any IU campus. The majority of these programs are intended to support independent research by connecting you with resources and mentors at the partner university. In some cases, you may be able to enroll in courses or gain valuable teaching experience. Because each program differs, you should review them carefully before applying. Graduate students are encouraged to check with their departments and schools about other international opportunities. Exchange participants receive funding to cover their expenses. IU's Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA) covers the cost of airfare, and participants receive a reasonable living stipend from either OVPIA or the partner institution. For all programs, the partner institution provides housing or helps participants make housing arrangements. NOTE THAT OVPIA WILL ACCEPT APPLICATIONS TO THESE TWO PROGRAMS THROUGH FEBRUARY 15, 2016 (i.e. beyond the application deadline that currently runs on OVPIA website).
  • EXTENDED Application Deadline: Short-term Faculty Exchanges to Poland and Russia

    Monday, February 15, 2016. Indiana University faculty and librarians can apply each year to participate in month-long exchange programs with university partners around the world. These competitive programs are administered and funded by the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA). Applicants must be tenure-line faculty members (including librarians) or research scientists/scholars at any IU campus. Non-tenure-line faculty members whose evaluation criteria for promotion include research or creative activity are also eligible with an explanation in the letter of support from their dean or chair. Participants receive sufficient funding to cover their expenses. OVPIA covers the cost of airfare, and participants receive a reasonable living stipend from either OVPIA or the partner institution. For the majority of programs, the partner institution provides or arranges housing. NOTE THAT OVPIA WILL ACCEPT APPLICATIONS TO THESE PROGRAMS THROUGH FEBRUARY 15, 2016 (i.e. beyond the application deadline that currently runs on OVPIA website).
  • Application Deadline: American Center for Mongolian Studies (ACMS) 2016 Fellowship Programs

    Monday, February 15, 2016. The American Center for Mongolian Studies aims to improve funding and study opportunities for scholars. The following programs offer scholars opportunities to conduct research, study, and gain professional experience in Mongolia. Funding opportunities include the ACMS Field Research Fellowship Program, ACMS Intensive Mongolian Language Summer Program, ACMS Library Fellowship Program, and ACMS Cultural Heritage Fellowship Program.
  • Appllication Deadline: American Councils 2016 Summer Russian Language Teachers Program

    Monday, February 15, 2016. American Councils for International Education (ACTR) is now accepting applications for the 2016 Summer Russian Language Teachers Program. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad, the program provides current and pre-service Russian instructors the unique opportunity to study Russian culture, language, and pedagogy at the Russian State Pedagogical (Herzen) University in downtown St. Petersburg, Russia for six weeks, from June 22 to August 8, 2016. The program begins with a mandatory pre-departure orientation in Washington, DC on June 22.
  • Application Deadline: American Councils 2016 Overseas Professional and Intercultural Training Program

    Monday, February 15, 2016. American Councils Study Abroad (ACTR) is pleased to announce that the application for our 2016 Overseas Professional and Intercultural Training (OPIT) Program is now open! Through OPIT’s six-week, English-language internships, students gain the substantive overseas professional experience and intercultural communication skills demanded by today’s global market. Participants can choose a placement in a variety of fields, including democracy building, human rights, education, business, law, gender issues, journalism, public health, environmental protection, and social services in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Serbia, and Ukraine. Knowledge of foreign-language is not required; however, the program does provide foreign language internships to interested and qualified students, and all students have the opportunity to combine their internships with intensive language study.
  • Application Deadline: Open Society Foundations Civil Society Scholar Awards

    Monday, February 15, 2015. The Civil Society Scholar Awards (CSSA) support international academic mobility to enable doctoral students and university faculty to access resources that enrich socially-engaged research and critical scholarship in their home country or region.

    Eligibility: The Awards are open to the following academic populations:

    • Doctoral students of eligible fields studying at accredited universities inside or outside of their home country;
    • Full-time faculty members (must have a minimum of a master’s degree) teaching at universities in their home country;
    • Who are citizens of: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Kosovo, Laos, Libya, Macedonia, Moldova, Mongolia, Myanmar/Burma, Nepal, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Serbia, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tunisia Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Yemen.

    Subject Areas: Any subject areas within the social sciences and humanities are eligible, but particularly those related to: law, justice, and governance; sustainable development and natural resource management; economic rights and empowerment of the poor; public health, social work and community development; new media law and policy; inclusive education; post-conflict studies; and human rights.

    Supported Grant Activities: The Awards support short-term, international academic projects, such as: fieldwork (data collection); research visits to libraries, archives or universities; course/curriculum development; and international research collaborations leading to a peer-reviewed publication. Requests for support for first year tuition and fees only will be considered on the basis of a clearly demonstrated need from doctoral students who have gained admission to universities outside of their home country.

    • Project Duration: Between 2-9 Months
    • Eligible Dates: August 1, 2016 – August 31, 2017
    • Maximum Funding Requests: Doctoral Students: $10,000; Faculty Members: $15,000.

    Competition for CSSA awards is merit-based. Selection will be made on the basis of proven academic excellence, a clear and justifiable need for international travel to complete the research project and relevance of the project to the development of open society in the applicant’s home country.

  • Catherine Robson (NYU), "“Voice and the Prussian Phonograph Commission in World War I”"

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:00pm. Persimmon Room, Indiana Memorial Union. European History Workshop. The paper is precirculated and available on Oncourse. If you don’t have access to the EHW Oncourse site, please email Roberta Pergher (rpergher@indiana.edu) and she will send you the paper.
  • IAUNRC Brown Bag Talk: Jamsheed Chosky (IU)

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 3015. Distinguished Professor and CEUS Chairman Jamsheed Choksy will speak informally on the adventures and trials of fieldwork in Pakistan, India, Iran, and the Middle East. He will focus on his undergraduate and graduates years (1981-1991), and on the differences between then and subsequent years. Pictures will be shown.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies

    Friday, February 19, 2016. The Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies is a forum for discourse and presentation of papers by scholars who have a particular interest in the study of religion. Canon Brian Mountford, Vicar of St Mary's Church and Fellow of St Hilda's College in the University of Oxford, will host the meeting. You are invited to make a presentation and lead a discussion of a relevant aspect of religious studies, or you may wish to participate as a panel member or as an observer. Your disquisition must adhere to an abstract of about 300 words approved by the Programme Committee of the Symposium. You are, also, encouraged to submit a paper, in keeping with your abstract, which may be published in an appropriate journal, book of conference proceedings. All papers presented for publication or inclusion in books or sponsored journals will be subject to peer review by external readers.
  • Conference: “Nabokov’s Idioms: Translating Foreignness”

    Friday, February 19, 2016. University of California, Santa Barbara. Entitled “Nabokov’s Idioms: Translating Foreignness,” this one-day symposium will investigate Vladimir Nabokov’s writerly practice as a broadly conceived effort of translation. An émigré writer whose works were translated into many languages, Nabokov was himself a notorious translator. Yet translation, in his work, is much more than the mere transposition of a literary text from one language into another – it is a creative principle. In this symposium we propose to investigate what we see as Nabokov’s translational poetics – a comprehensive effort to relate to foreignness and the ‘Other’ that is, as such, also a powerful contribution to literary modernism, its media, and its critique. The symposium, which will be held at the University of California, Santa Barbara on Friday, February 19, 2016, is held in honor of professor emeritus Don Barton Johnson in recognition of his extensive contributions to the field of Nabokov studies.
  • Balassi Institute Graduate Fellowship in Hungarian Studies

    Sunday, February 21, 2016. Indiana University's Department of Central Eurasian Studies invites applications for the Balassi Institute Graduate Fellowship in Hungarian Studies. The Fellowship will be given to a student who has been admitted to the Department of Central Eurasian Studies and the University Graduate School at Indiana University-Bloomington and is primarily engaged in research falling within the field of Hungarian language and area studies, including but not limited to Hungarian culture and history. Indiana University is a research university with world-class programs in both area studies and the disciplines; its libraries hold the richest university-based Hungarian collections in the US. All applicants are welcome, but citizens of the US and Canada are strongly preferred. Annual fellowship benefits include tuition remission, health insurance, and a fellowship stipend of a minimum of $12,000; the fellowship is renewable.

    Applicants should submit a letter of interest to Balassi Institute Graduate Fellowship Selection Committee, Central Eurasian Studies, Global & International Studies Building 3024, Bloomington, IN 47405-1105. Include your full name, IU degree program and department, description of your research and two letters of recommendation.

    Applications received by February 21, 2016 will receive priority for consideration.

    For those that are not currently at IU would also need to apply for admission. Although the deadline for admission has passed we would still accept applications for admission as long as they were complete (application, statement of purpose, all official transcripts, three letters of recommendation) by February 21st.
  • Polish Film Night

    Monday, February 22, 2016, 6:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 0003. Polish Film Night. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Kim Hodong (Seoul National University), “Was ‘Da Yuan’ a Chinese Dynasty? A Mongol Perspective"

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 4:00pm. Distinguished Alumni Room, Indiana Memorial Union. Co-sponsors: Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center, and Department of Central Eurasian Studies
  • Jay Howard (Butler), "Why Won't They Talk? Using Discussion to Facilitate Learning"

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 12:00pm. School of Public and Environmental Affairs 167. Faculty often wish to engage students in class discussion, but sometimes our efforts fall flat and we give up the effort. Why should we seek to engage students? What classroom norms sometimes undermine students’ participation? Which students are most likely to participate and to choose not to participate? How can an instructor manage both the dominant talkers and the non-talkers? In an interactive session, we will engage each of these questions using a review of the research to identify ways to structure class discussion to engage students and maximize learning.
  • Application Deadline: IU GPSG Research Award

    Friday, Februrary 26, 2016. The GPSG research award is offered through a competitive process for graduate and professional students at Indiana University-Bloomington. A flat award of $1,000 is given to help support research expenses incurred in connection with academic research, such as travel costs related to field, archival or laboratories research, payment for research related services, and purchase of research related supplies. Note: Expenses that are not supported are typing and duplicating of dissertations, normal living expenses, and travel costs for conferences or workshops. Consideration for Spring 2016 Research Awards is given for research conducted during summer 2016, fall 2016, and spring 2017. Research awards are offered in spring semester only. GPSG Research Awards are merit-based awards. Other funding sources will not be considered as part of the application. If you still have questions after reviewing the following information, please contact our Awards Officer at gpsgawds@indiana.edu.
  • Application Deadline: Jesse Fine Fellowship for Course Development

    Sunday, February 28, 2016. The Jesse Fine Fellowship supports the development of new and revised courses that address practical and professional ethics in curriculum across the University. The Fellowship is made possible by a gift from Dorothy Fine to honor the memory of her husband, IU graduate Jesse Fine. Courses in all fields and schools are eligible; successful proposals may involve designing a new course, or proposing a substantive revision to an existing course in order to include more ethics or improve its treatment of ethics. The course must be approved to be offered by the applicant’s home department or school before the end of 2018. Faculty at all levels as well as graduate students who teach may apply. Applications will be reviewed in a competitive process. Up to four recipients may be chosen. Each receives $2500 in two installments of $1250 each, one receivable upon acceptance of the Fellowship, and the second after the course has been taught, as confirmed by a letter from the department chair.
  • Application Deadline: Józef Tischner Junior Visiting Fellowship 2016

    Monday, February 29, 2016. The Józef Tischner Fellowship is open to all academic disciplines in the humanities and social sciences; a thematic relation to one of the Institute’s research fields is strongly encouranged (details please see on www.iwm.at/research). The Józef Tischner Fellow will be invited to spend a six-month term from July to December 2016 at the IWM and receive a stipend of EUR 1,800 per month to cover all expenses related to the stay in Vienna. In addition, the IWM provides her/him with an office including access to internet, in-house research and administrative facilities as well as other services free of charge. Please visit www.iwm.at/fellowships/tischner to see all relevant details about eligibility, application procedure etc.
  • Application Deadline: Research Fellowships (10) at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany)

    Monday, February 29, 2016. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) München will award up to 10 Research Fellowships to excellent junior academics in 2016. The "LMU Research Fellowships" are an integral part of the "LMU Academic Career Program", aimed at recruiting excellent early-career postdocs. Candidates from all fields of research who have completed their doctoral studies with outstanding results within the last three years may apply. The Fellowships will be awarded for two years. In exceptional cases, funding for an extra year will be awarded to projects for which additional research time is needed due to the scope and originality of the planned research. Candidates must present an independent research project as part of their application. Applications may be submitted in English or German.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: Ellipsis Across Borders Conference 2016

    Monday, February 29, 2016. This conference is organized as part of the project Experimental Morphosyntax of South Slavic Languages, where agreement patterns are studied with a uniform methodology in six locations across the Western Balkans (in former Yugoslavia). This project has both a scientific and social agenda. On one side, it aims to investigate First and Last conjunct agreement in South Slavic languages and thus contribute to the currently debated topic (Bošković 2009, Marušič et al. 2015) which revolves around the need for clearer descriptions of the data. On the other side, the project aims to propagate psycholinguistic studies of South Slavic languages through cooperation between linguists across the borders of the former Yugoslavia.
  • Submission Deadline: Annual Prize for an Outstanding Published Essay in the Field of Central/East/South European Cinema and Media Studies

    Monday, February 29, 2016. The Central/East/South European Cinemas Scholarly Interest Group at the Society of Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) is pleased to announce the second annual prize for an outstanding published essay in the field of Central/East/South European Cinema and Media Studies. Submissions will be judged by a panel of experts, and the winner will be announced at the upcoming 2016 SCMS meeting in Atlanta, GA. Eligibility: Any single-authored essay on Central/East/South European media published in the field in the calendar year of 2015 as a journal article or a chapter in a collected volume (chapters excerpted from monographs will not be considered). Essay should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words (with a 10,000 word limit, notes and works cited included). Essays must be published in English. Authors need NOT be members of SCMS. Submission guidelines: We request anonymous submissions. The author’s name, essay title, exact date and venue for publication, personal contact address, and academic affiliation should appear only on a separate cover sheet (no identifying information in the essay file please). Essays and cover pages should be attached in the email as separate document files and directed to Evan Torner (evan.torner@uc.edu) and Ana Grgic (ag219@st-andrews.ac.uk).
  • Polish Folk Dancing Workshop

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016, 4:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 1134. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Application Deadline: REEI/Mellon Dissertation Write-Up Fellowship (One Semester)

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. One award of $7,500 plus tuition fee remission for one academic semester will provide support to an Indiana University graduate student of the Russian East European region near the completion of his or her doctoral program in any field. The fellowship is intended for applicants who have completed all course work, passed all required preliminary examinations, received approval for their research proposal, and completed all formal components of their dissertation field research or data collection. The fellowship is intended to support one semester of full-time writing in which the recipient will not be engaged in other employment. The fellowship will be granted on the basis of the scholarly potential of the applicant, the quality and scholarly importance of the proposed work and its importance to the development of scholarship on the REEI region. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the recommendation of the applicant's dissertation advisor in regard to the prospects for the applicant to complete and defend the dissertation at the end of the one semester fellowship or soon thereafter.
  • Application Deadline: REEI Graduate Assistantships

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. REEI offers funding for graduate assistants. Positions require a 20-hour per week employment commitment. In return, graduate assistants receive a stipend of at least $15,000 and fee remission for up to 30 credit hours per year. These awards are contingent upon receipt of funds from the US Department of Education. New applicants are not as competitive for graduate assistantships as returning students unless they have had significant previous experience in newsletter publication or web design. Applications are available in REEI and online. Application deadline is March 1. Applicants for GA positions may be contacted to arrange for an interview with the REEI senior staff.
  • Application Deadline: George F. Kennan Fellowship

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. The Kennan Institute seeks fellowship applicants from diverse, policy-oriented sectors such as media, business, local government, law, civil society, and academia to examine important political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues in Russia, Ukraine, and the region. Among the aims of the new fellowships are to build bridges between traditional academia and the policy world, as well as to maintain and increase collaboration among researchers from Russia, Ukraine, and the U.S. The fellowships are funded by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. George F. Kennan Fellows will be based at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. for three-month residencies. Fellows will receive access to the Library of Congress, National Archives, and policy research centers in Washington, D.C., as well as the opportunity to meet with key experts and officials at the State Department, USAID, Department of Defense, and Congress. While conducting research, the George F. Kennan Fellows are expected to actively participate in discussions with the policy and academic communities, including speaking engagements at the Wilson Center as well as potentially outside of Washington D.C., and attending meetings, conferences, and other activities organized by the Kennan Institute and Wilson Center. Upon completion of the fellowships, the grantees become alumni, for whom Kennan will continue to offer opportunities for collaboration and engagement.
  • Application Deadline: Central Asia in World History 2016 Summer Institute

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. The Ohio State University (Columbus). Explore the history of Central Asia through a three-week Summer Institute (July 10-29, 2016) sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities in Columbus, Ohio. Central Asia in World History will offer middle and high school teachers from all subjects an intensive experience to hear presentations by experts, interact with scholars, work with research materials, view and discuss films, and sample the traditional food and music of the region. Participants will also develop a curriculum resource and have the opportunity to consult with a master teacher about pedagogy and how Institute content articulates with current education standards. Participants will receive a stipend of $2,700, a certificate for in-service credit and/or professional development hours, and have the option of enrolling for three graduate credits from The Ohio State University.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: 11th Slavic Linguistics Society Annual Meeting

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. We invite individual abstract submissions and panel proposals on all topics and frameworks within Slavic linguistics. Please note that current SLS-membership is a precondition for presenting at the annual meeting. Participants will be able to join SLS (or renew their membership) when registering for the conference online. Invited Speakers: Barbara Citko (Washington); Marc Greenberg (Kansas); Andrea Sims (Ohio State). Abstract Submission Guidelines: Abstracts (limit 3000 characters) should be written in English or Russian. In case of acceptance, oral presentations are possible in other Slavic languages as long as a summary in English or Russian is provided. Abstracts and other proposals should be submitted online at sls2016@utoronto.ca. They should be anonymous, i.e. should not contain name(s) or affiliations(s) of the author(s) or any other self-identifying information. Submissions are limited to one single-authored or one joint abstract. The paper title, author name(s), affiliation(s), and contact information should be given in the body of the email. The abstract itself should contain only the title. Panel proposals should include panel title plus names of 3 or 4 presenters, one of whom should serve as chief organizer. Contact Joseph Schallert by 15 February 2016. Abstract and paper proposal submission deadline: March 1, 2016. Notification of acceptance for papers and panels: April 1, 2016. The conference is hosted by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Department of Linguistics at the University of Toronto.
  • Application Deadline: XVI International Congress of Slavists

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. The International Congress of Slavists is a quinquennial gathering of Slavists in the humanities and social sciences from forty countries worldwide. It is organized by the International Committee of Slavists (ICS), which consists of the chairs of each of constituent national committees. The full ICS meets during the year of the Congress itself. At other times, the business of the ICS is handled by the full Presidium, which meets once in intervening years to plan the next Congress in detail, or by the reduced Presidium, which meets in other intervening years to act on minor issues that require resolution. The XVI International Congress of Slavists will be held in late summer 2018 in Belgrade, Serbia. The general plan will contain a day of arrival (August 19), a day of departure (August 27), and six working days for the Congress split into 3-day segments separated by a free day (August 23) for excursions organized by the host Serbian Committee of Slavists.
  • Application Deadline: 2017 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. The University of Chicago Press and Signs are pleased to announce the competition for the 2017 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship. Named in honor of the founding editor of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, the Catharine Stimpson Prize is designed to recognize excellence and innovation in the work of emerging feminist scholars. The Catharine Stimpson Prize is awarded biennially to the best paper in an international competition. Leading feminist scholars from around the globe will select the winner. The prizewinning paper will be published in Signs, and the author will be provided an honorarium of $1,000. All papers submitted for the Stimpson Prize will be considered for peer review and possible publication in Signs. Eligibility: Feminist scholars in the early years of their careers (fewer than seven years since receipt of the terminal degree, including current graduate students) are invited to submit papers for the Stimpson Prize. Papers may be on any topic that falls under the broad rubric of interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. Submissions must be no longer than 10,000 words (including notes and references) and must conform to the guidelines for Signs contributors.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: "Patriotic (Non) Consumption: Food, Fashion, and Media"

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016. The economic crises of 2008-present and the recent political confrontations have shaped patterns of patriotic consumption and non-consumption (a refusal to consume particular types of products, symbols and discourses) in the countries of the Central, Eastern and Southern Europe as well as Central Asia, Caucasus and Russia, signaling their participation in the global economy as consumer societies. (Abridged) Please see the Call for Papers for complete details.
  • Application Deadlines: Sara and Albert Reuben Scholarships to Support the Study of the Holocaust

    Undergraduate Deadline: Wednesday, March 2, 2016. Graduate Deadline: Friday, March 4, 2016. Two Scholarships will be awarded: one up to $3,000 & one up to $10,000. During the academic year 2016-2017, the Sara and Albert Reuben scholarships may support funding to attend Holocaust-related conferences, to do research in archives and libraries, to subsidize a Holocaust-related internship, to engage in research and to support honors theses, master’s theses, or a dissertation, and other academic initiatives related to the Holocaust. The monies can be awarded in the fall, spring, or summer when the recipient is a full-time student. The scholarships are open to all Indiana University Bloomington undergraduate and graduate students from any department or college on campus. Undergraduate students must have a minimum GPA of 3.4. Students must be enrolled at Indiana University Bloomington during the Spring 2016 semester (the semester of application) and continue as enrolled students during the semester or year when the scholarship funding is awarded.
  • The Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center & The Russian and East European Institute present the "Syllabus Design Workshop"

    Thursday, March 3, 2016, 10:00am. Global & International Studies Building 3067. The Workshop will include presentations that cover: Developing course themes and concepts; Writing the course description; Creating learning objectives, course policies, a grading rubric, and course activities; Picking and organizing a reading list; Drafting a schedule; Designing for semester, eight week, and summer courses. Samuel Buelow is a PhD candidate in Anthropology with minors in CEUS and Gender Studies. He has developed syllabi for courses at both IUB and IUPUI in the departments of Folklore, Anthropology, and Gender Studies, Collins, and Global Village. Breakfast Provided, please RSVP to aces@indiana.edu.
  • Conference: CLACS Graduate Conference, “ACCESS and CONTROL: Resources and Technology in the Global South”

    Thursday through Saturday, March 3-5, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. The 5th annual conference of the CLACS Graduate Student Association, ACCESS and CONTROL: Resources and Technology in the Global South, is explicitly interdisciplinary and encourages participants to expose past and present challenges that have influenced access to resources and technology throughout the Global South with emphasis on local, regional, and national level state actors. Within this theme, we invite graduate students from diverse and professional backgrounds to submit abstracts exploring access to resources, ideas, technology, and information. Though being sponsored by Indiana University’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, we welcome research from other Global South regions including (but not limited to) Africa, South Asia, Southwest Asia, etc. Other abstracts relating to this theme will also be considered.
  • Book Launch with Alvin Rosenfeld and Günther Jikeli (IU), “"Deciphering the New Antisemitism”"

    Friday, March 4, 2016, 12:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 4067. Jewish Studies Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop.
  • Mona Siegel (Cal State, Sacramento), “European and Chinese feminists in the interwar period”

    Friday, March 4, 2016, 12:00pm. Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union. European History Workshop. The paper is precirculated and available on Oncourse. If you don’t have access to the EHW Oncourse site, please email Roberta Pergher (rpergher@indiana.edu) and she will send you the paper.
  • In Light Film Festival and International Arthouse Series presents The Russian Woodpecker (2015)

    Friday, March 4, 2016, 9:30pm. IU Cinema. Directed By: Chad Gracia, Not Rated Documentary (War), 80 Minutes. Fedor Alexandrovich is a radioactive man. He was four years old in 1986, when he was exposed to the toxic effects of the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown and forced to leave his home. Now 33, he is an artist in Ukraine, with radioactive strontium in his bones and a singular obsession with Chernobyl, and with the giant, mysterious steel pyramid now rotting away 2 miles from the disaster site: a hulking Cold War weapon known as the Duga and nicknamed the “Russian Woodpecker” for the constant clicking radio frequencies that it emits. In Gracia’s award-winning documentary/conspiracy thriller, Alexandrovich returns to the ghost towns in the radioactive Exclusion Zone to try to find answers—and to decide whether to risk his life by revealing them, amid growing clouds of Ukraine’s emerging revolution and war. (2K DCP Presentation)
  • Conference: Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference and Russian Symposium

    Saturday, March 5, 2016. Mercyhurst University (Erie, PA). Conference organizers invite proposals for panels or individual papers addressing all disciplines related to history and historical knowledge; and for the Russian symposium, any research topics on Russia, Soviet Union, or the former republics of the Soviet Union. The conference and the symposium will give students an opportunity to present their research papers and receive a feedback from the scholars in the field and the audience. The suggested paper topics may include, but are not limited to the history of culture, politics, economics, religion, race, gender, literature, media, cinema, and art.
  • Application Deadline: Paul Celan Fellowships 2016/2017 for translators

    Sunday, March 6, 2016. The program supports translations of canonical texts, contemporary key works in the humanities, social sciences and cultural studies from Eastern to Western European languages or vice versa, or between two Eastern European languages. Special emphasis is put on translations of relevant works written by East European authors and/or female scholars. No applications for works of fiction and poetry are being accepted. Fellows will spend 3 – 6 months between July 2016 and June 2017 at the IWM in Vienna and receive a monthly stipend of EUR 2,050 to cover all expenses related to the stay in Vienna. The IWM provides fellows with an office incl. access to internet, in-house research and administrative facilities as well as other services free of charge. Further details and online application: www.iwm.at/fellowships/celan.
  • Poetry and Pierogi Night

    Monday, March 7, 2016, 6:30pm. Global & International Studies Building 1134. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Application Deadline: IU GPSG Travel Award

    Friday, March 11, 2016. The GPSG Travel Award is offered through a competitive process for graduate and professional students at Indiana University Bloomington. A flat award of $500 is given to help support travel expenses to conferences at which the student’s work will be presented (i.e. speeches, posters or interactive design), or to help support travel to workshops, special trainings, competitions and auditions that will benefit the student professionally. Funds may be used for registration fees, presentation materials, transportation, and lodging/food associated with the conference, workshop, training, competition or audition. Students may apply for one travel award per semester, but may apply for travel awards for multiple events/conferences in different semesters, even if they are a previous winner. Note: GPSG Travel Awards are awarded as university fellowships; be aware of their total financial aid need and the amount of financial aid you have already received. If you have already reached your financial aid maximum for the current semester, you may be ineligible for this award. More information about financial aid need can be found through the IU Student Financial Aid Guidelines (see the Graduate Student Fellowships Section) or the Financial Aid Office, and information about how much aid you have already received can be found in OneStart. This award is not intended to fund research. Please see GPSG Research Awards for info on awards for research funding. GPSG Travel Awards are merit-based awards. Non-travel related funding will not be considered when reviewing applications. This award is not intended to fund research. Please see GPSG Research Awards for info on awards for research funding. GPSG Travel Awards are merit-based awards. Non-travel related funding will not be considered when reviewing applications. If you still have questions after reviewing the following information, please contact our Awards Officer at gpsgawds@indiana.edu.
  • Conference: 2016 SOYUZ Symposium, "Politics of Difference: Migration, Nation, Postsocialist Left and Right?"

    Friday and Saturday, March 11-12, 2016. University of Chicago. The SOYUZ theme this year gains immediacy and poignancy from the migration and refugee crisis in Europe in Autumn 2015. While some leaders repudiate migrants from points east by calling for a “Christian” Europe, others welcome them as a Christian gesture. Such differences are not new to postsocialism. Religion, out-migration, borders, nationality have been flash points repeatedly. The conference will examine these and other forms of difference-making within and across contemporary postsocialist contexts. Economic globalization and the integration of eastern Europe into the European Union have provided the context for postsocialist transformation. Yet, such projects of integration have encouraged new articulations of difference and reframed old ones: Minorities, diasporas, east-west relations, techno-environmental differences and border-disputes. Neo-nationalist groups rail against in-migrants and minorities at the same time as nation-branding projects posit national distinctiveness as a lure for foreign investment and tourism. Narratives of “culture wars” vilifying differences of sexual orientation and life-style have erupted, opposing conservative religious and political groups to the purportedly cosmopolitan values of “the West.” New xenophobias and homophobias compete with discourses of tolerance, each staking claims to what constitutes belonging and civilization. Deep discontent over waves of neoliberalization, austerity, corruption and kleptocracies have reconfigured economic polarization as political difference, with Left and Right both taking on new valences within an increasingly agitated political spectrum.
  • 23rd Annual ACES Conference

    Saturday, March 12, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. It is with great pleasure that CEUS wishes to invite panel and paper proposals to the 23nd Annual ACES Conference to be held on March 12th, 2016 at Indiana University in Bloomington. Students, faculty, and independent scholars are cordially invited to submit abstracts of papers addressing all topics pertaining to Central Eurasian Studies by November 4th, 2015. For the purposes of this conference, Central Eurasian Studies refers to the study of the historical and contemporary Afghan, Balto-Finnic, Hungarian, Iranian, Mongolic, Tibetan, Tungusic, and Turkic peoples, languages, cultures, and states. Submission of pre-organized panels is strongly encouraged. Individual papers are also welcome and will be assigned by the Conference Committee to a suitable panel. All proposals will be subject to a double-blind review process.
  • Conference: Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies Monday through Wednesday, March 14-16, 2016. Old Library of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford (UK). The Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies is a forum for discourse and presentation of papers by scholars who have a particular interest in the study of religion. Canon Brian Mountford, Vicar of St Mary's Church and Fellow of St Hilda's College in the University of Oxford, will host the meeting. You are invited to make a presentation and lead a discussion of a relevant aspect of religious studies, or you may wish to participate as a panel member or as an observer. Your disquisition must adhere to an abstract of about 300 words approved by the Programme Committee of the Symposium. You are, also, encouraged to submit a paper, in keeping with your abstract, which may be published in an appropriate journal, book of conference proceedings. All papers presented for publication or inclusion in books or sponsored journals will be subject to peer review by external readers.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: The 18th Nordic Migration Conference

    Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Global inequalities between countries and regions in terms of income, security, rights, and living conditions are today driving increasing numbers of people into crossing international borders in search of personal safety, economic opportunities and better future prospects. At the same time, social inequality is sharply on the rise within societies across the globe, as traditional structures of work and welfare are rearranged and/or dismantled. In an increasingly globalized world, boundaries of class, nationality, ethnicity, gender and legal statuses are intersecting in new ways, giving rise to changing and new dimensions of inequality within and between both migrant sending and migrant receiving societies. In this conference we wish to explore the diverse links between international migration and social inequality, in a Nordic, European and global context. We invite scholars from across disciplinary boundaries to engage in a discussion of how these changes can be conceptualized and studied, from a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives. Contributions are welcomed that reflect on how economic, political, cultural and social factors in origin and destination countries affect migration and shape diverse societies. We welcome papers which discuss how issues such as global inequalities, states policies, legal frameworks, media discourses and cultural boundaries shape the dynamics of migration and migrants’ everyday experiences.
  • Application Deadline (Fall & Academic Year 2016-2017): Title VIII Funding for American Councils Language Programs

    Tuesday, March 15, 2016. U.S. citizens who have completed a Bachelor’s Degree and intend to pursue graduate studies, M.A. students, and Ph.D. candidates are eligible to receive Title VIII Fellowship support for participation in American Councils intensive language programs in Russia, Central Asia, the South Caucasus, the Balkans, Moldova, and Ukraine. Title VIII Fellowships are available for the following programs: Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (RLASP), Eurasian Regional Language Program (ERLP), and Balkan Language Initiative (BLI). The application deadline is February 15th for summer programs, and March 15th for fall and academic year programs. Please visit http://www.acstudyabroad.org/title-viii/ for more information or contact us via email at: outbound@americancouncils.org. American Councils staff are also glad to speak with you, your students, and your colleagues directly; we can be reached at (202) 833-7522.
  • Application Deadline: The Vaclav Havel Library Foundation Fellowship for Human Rights (undergraduates)

    Tuesday, March 15, 2016. The Vaclav Havel Library Foundation announces The Vaclav Havel Library Foundation Fellowship for Human Rights, a summer fellowship in Prague for undergraduate students studying in the United States. Founded as part of Havel@80, the annual fellowship program will offer students a two week, fully-funded opportunity to learn from and engage with organizations in the Czech Republic working to carry forward Havel’s legacy in the field of human rights.
  • Conference: The 54th Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    Thursday, March 17 through Saturday, March 19, 2016. Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The Fifty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS) will be held 17-19 March 2016 at the Embassy Suites Hotel in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The meeting will be hosted by the University of Alabama and the City of Tuscaloosa. The SCSS is the largest of the regional Slavic and Eurasian Studies associations and its programs attract national and international scholarly participation. The purpose of SCSS is to promote scholarship, education, and in all other ways to advance scholarly interest in Russian, Soviet, East European, and Eurasian studies in the Southern region of the United States and nationwide. Membership in SCSS is open to all persons interested in furthering these goals.
  • Conference: American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) 2016 Annual Meeting

    Thursday, March 17 through Sunday, March 20, 2016. Harvard University (Cambridge, MA). The ACLA's annual conferences have a distinctive structure in which most papers are grouped into twelve-person seminars that meet two hours per day for three days of the conference to foster extended discussion. Some eight-person (or smaller) seminars meet just the first two days of the conference. This structure allows each participant to be a full member of one seminar, and to sample other seminars during the remaining time blocks. Depending on space availability, we may also consider accepting a limited number of one-day seminars, especially if they are innovative either in presentation format or in terms of theme. The conference also includes plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions, and other events.
  • Conference: 47th Annual NeMLA Convention

    Thursday, March 17 through Sunday, March 20, 2016. Hartford, Connecticut. The Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) is a scholarly organization for professionals in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and other modern languages. With more than 2,000 members, NeMLA is the largest of the regional MLA affiliates. The annual convention affords NeMLA’s principal opportunity to carry on a tradition of lively research and pedagogical exchange in language and literature. The convention includes panels and seminars, roundtables and caucus meetings, workshops, literary readings, film screenings, and guest speakers. In addition, NeMLA supports its members through awards, fellowships, and opportunities for professional development. The Northeast Modern Language Association will meet in Hartford, Connecticut, for its 47th annual convention and will feature approximately 400 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events.
  • Conference: 13th Annual GOSECA Conference, “Insiders and Outsiders: Belonging and Identity in Eastern Europe”

    Friday through Sunday, March 18-20, 2016. University of Pittsburgh (PA). The recent influx of refugees to Eastern and Central Europe created a political and humanitarian crisis that has sparked intense international debate. The varied national responses both within and outside the European Union raise practical questions about asylum definitions and integration efforts, but they also point to larger theoretical questions about inclusion and exclusion, belonging and identity. How do democratic societies deal with cultural difference? What role do religion, gender and ethnicity play in national cohesion? What role should international conventions play in governing the specific actions of states? What are the financial and moral responsibilities of states and national populations? Moreover, how do recent events compare to diaspora and refugee crises of the past? Specifically, how have historical relationships between countries and peoples impacted contemporary responses to political events or shaped narratives and structures related to belonging and exclusion? These questions speak to the intersections of international relations, historical inquiry, cultural politics, and state and international public policy in Eastern Europe and Central Eurasia. This year's conference theme encourages participants to think critically about the impact that fluid, adaptable conceptions of belonging and exclusion in the realms – past and present – of domestic and international politics, economics, cultural production, social relations, the law, and demography, among others, have had on their specific field of study.
  • Terje Østebø (Florida), “Islamic Reformism as Network of Meaning: The Intellectualist Movement in Ethiopia"

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 4:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 2067. Co-sponsors: Islamic Studies Program, Center on American and Global Security, and Center for the Study of the Middle East
  • Registration Deadline: International Symposium “Education and social inequality,” XVII April International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016. The Symposium will generate a scholarly discussion on education and social inequality, considering how educational systems respond to social inequality and other forms of social stratification. Conference participants are invited to address the theme of social inequality in and through education from perspectives of their various disciplines, theoretical and pragmatic standpoints and geographic locations. The Symposium will be one of the major streams of a larger conference held at the HSE University annually, the International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development. The Conference attracts distinguished scholars in social and behavioral sciences from Russia, Europe, Asia, and America. About 1500 scholars usually participate The plenary sessions and special round tables feature senior Russian Government officials, high-level representatives of the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the CEOs of the largest Russian and international companies.
  • Submission Deadline: Ambiguous Geographies

    Tuesday and Wednesday, March 22-23, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. The Center for the Study of Global Change is pleased to announce the opportunity for Indiana University graduate students to participate in our upcoming symposium on Ambiguous Geographies. This 2-day symposium, scheduled on March 22-23, seeks to articulate a scholarly and practical framework for global studies and for understanding the world’s increasingly borderless, changing, and ambiguous territories. This is a great opportunity for students to engage in a discussion that furthers an ongoing conversation amongst the area and global studies centers in the School of Global and International Studies about the need for a new paradigm for pursuing regional studies. Please read over the announcement for more information — the deadline for submissions is Monday, February 8th.
  • Submission Deadline: Cross Cultural Studies: Education and Science (new journal)

    Friday, March 25, 2016. The new journal Cross Cultural Studies: Education and Science (CCS:ES) provides an intellectual platform for Slavic scholars from different countries. The journal supports interdisciplinary studies in the humanities and social sciences. The journal is intended for specialists, advanced degree students, teachers and scholars of different countries. The journal will publish in English and Russian specific as well as general overview articles, reviews of books, textbooks, and other pedagogical materials. The journal will appear quarterly. The electronic version of the journal is distributed approximately 25 days after the submission date. The print version is available fifteen days after the appearance of the electronic version. Submissions for the first issue will be accepted until March 25, 2016. The cost of the publication is $100 US. Correspondence and submissions can be sent to: beyer@middlebury.edu, or infoccs.edu@gmail.com.
  • Application Deadline: 2016 International Summer School in Comparative Conflict Studies

    Friday, March 25, 2016. The Center for Comparative Conflict Studies (CFCCS) at the Faculty of Media and Communications (FMK), Singidunum University invites you to apply for the seventh International Summer School in Comparative Conflict Studies. The 2016 Summer School will take place at the Faculty of Media and Communications in Belgrade, from June 27 to July 4, 2015. Language of instruction for all courses is English. Students who complete the course requirements may transfer the course credit to their home institution (5 ECTS). We are now receiving applications for the following five courses (Applicants can attend only one course from this list):
    • 1. Dr. Dino Abazović (University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina), "Religion and Conflict: The Balkans’ Explorations vs. Explorations of the Balkans"
    • 2. Dr. Maxine David (University of Leiden, Netherlands), "From Intervention to Non-Intervention: The Triumph of State Sovereignty over Human Rights?"
    • 3. Dr. Jelena Tošić (University of Vienna, Austria), "Orientalism, Balkanism, Occidentalism: Thinking through Discourses of 'Othering' and 'Conflict'"
    • 4. Dr. Orli Fridman (Faculty of Media & Communications (FMK) and SIT Balkans, Serbia), "Memory and Conflict: Remembering and Forgetting in Divided Societies"
    • 5. Dr. Jelisaveta Blagojević (Faculty of Media & Communications (FMK), Serbia), "From Brotherhood and Unity to EU Integration: The Shades of Politics in Serbia"
    We invite graduate students, advanced undergraduate students, individuals holding professional positions in the civic, public or private sector from all countries to apply. For all questions and information please contact us at summerschool@cfccs.org. For more details on our work please visit www.cfccs.org.
  • Conference: Ninth Annual Romanian Studies Conference

    Friday and Satruday, March 25-26, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. The Romanian Studies Organization at Indiana University is pleased to announce its ninth annual international conference, taking place March 25-26, 2016, on the Bloomington campus. We welcome proposals from graduate students and recent PhDs on any topic related to Romania, Moldova, or the Romanian diaspora, in any discipline or methodology. Past panels have included: “Landscapes of Heritage in Romania,” “Politicizing Ethnicity: Individual and Collective Identities,” “Agency and Authenticity under Socialism,” “The Pain of Transition: Continuities and Changes between Regimes,” and “Civil Society, Corruption, and Resistance in (Post) Communist Romania.” We especially encourage interdisciplinary approaches but we regularly accept papers from historians, political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, folklorists, linguists, literary critics, and musicologists. This year, the keynote talk titled “The Good and the Bad: Civil Society Input in Romanian Transitional Justice” will be delivered by Dr. Lavinia Stan, associate professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at St. Francis Xavier University, in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada. Dr. Stan received her PhD in Political Science from University of Toronto. Dr. Stan has authored two books on civil society and post-communist transition in Romania: Leaders and Laggards: Governance, Civicness and Ethnicity in Post-Communist Romania (2003) and Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Romania: The Politics of Memory (2013), published by Cambridge University Press. She has also contributed to, edited, and co-authored eight other books that analyze post-communist transition and democracy in Romania. Expanding on her previous work, Dr. Stan’s talk will argue that some civil society can have a seriously detrimental input on transitional justice and, through it, on the democratization effort. In post-communist Romania, groups and associations gathering former communist-era perpetrators (secret political police agents, and tenants occupying abusively confiscated dwellings) and collaborators (the Romanian Orthodox Church) have persistently undermined accountability, transparency and the rule of law, while blocking meaningful reckoning with the communist crimes in which they participated. Please see the flyer or contact Catalin Cristoloveanu for more details.
  • IU Spring Ballet, “Four Faces of Balanchine”

    Friday and Saturday, March 25-26, 2016. Pre-Show Talk at 6:30pm. Performance at 7:30pm. IU Musical Arts Center. George Balanchine (b. Georgi Melitonovitch Balanchivadze in St. Petersburg, Russia) was the choreographic genius of the 20th century. “See the music, hear the dance,” he said — and you will in this stunning spring collection! RAYMONDA VARIATIONS: Balanchine loved Alexander Glazunov’s music for the ballet Raymonda, praising its “grand and generous manner” and its “joy and playfulness.” See that admiration personified in this abstract, highly romantic dazzler. TARANTELLA: Fascinating rhythms … Neapolitan flair. The master took Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s marvelous music and created a pas de deux to show off the explosive talent of Edward Villella and his incandescent partner, Patricia McBride. Enjoy this virtuosic showstopper! ELEGIE: Russian soul personified—Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s exquisite Suite No. 3 and Balanchine’s inspired choreography capture its essence in this dream ballet. SERENADE: Set to Tchaikovsky’s iconic music, here is Balanchine’s first made-in-America ballet. A stunningly beautiful portrait of symmetry that bewitches audiences everywhere.
  • Helen and Martin Schwartz Lectures in Jewish Studies by Professor Tony Kushner and Aimee Bunting (Southampton), "Introducing the Co-Present"

    Monday, March 28, 2016, 5:30pm. Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union. The historiography of the Holocaust has long been shaped by the triangular formation of the victim, the perpetrator and the bystander categories, language not only reflecting legal terminology but also a sense of morality that continues to permeate confrontations with the Holocaust today. These lectures will not dismiss those categories but will introduce and argue for the importance of another - that of the co-present. This group of remarkable individuals co-existed alongside the Holocaust as captives, liberators, soldiers, doctors to name but a few, and they came from many different backgrounds and cultures. They encountered the Holocaust, its victims and its perpetrators and drew that experience in to their lives with lasting consequences both for themselves and for Holocaust memory and representation. Their remarkable personal experiences of being co-present will form the basis for the second of these lectures. Firstly, in this opening lecture, we will endeavour to problematize perhaps the most unfixed of the three traditional categories – that of the bystander – and to argue that there are those who occupied another space in the realm of the Holocaust that is, as yet not fully explored: the Co-Present. The Co-Present, we will argue, utilising examples within and beyond Holocaust studies (including Apartheid South Africa), rather than being a simple sub-category of 'bystander', enables a more subtle approach allowing for cross over into victim and even perpetrator status.
  • Conference: “America’s Role in the World: Issues Facing the Next President” (Inaugural Conference)

    Tuesday through Thursday, March 29-31, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. The next President will face a momentous set of global challenges when he or she takes office in 2017. These include both pressing foreign policy and security issues and strategic challenges. Issues that are likely to command the attention of a new President include: how to address the spreading turmoil in the Middle East driven by the rise of ISIS; the effort to contain Iran’s nuclear weapons capability, and how to adapt last century international institutions to meet the global challenges of the present century, ranging from nuclear proliferation, to the growing risk of cyber attack, and political and economic inequality around the world. How these policy choices are framed in the next few months will shape public opinion and, as a consequence, available policy choices for a new administration. The conference aims to reflect the tradition of non-partisan support for American engagement in the world, embodied by conference co-conveners, Congressman Lee Hamilton and Senator Richard Lugar and hosted by Ambassador Lee Feinstein, Dean of the School of Global and International Studies. The conference will bring together scholars, practitioners, and journalists to identify and debate issues of critical importance to the country from a variety of perspectives.
  • Helen and Martin Schwartz Lectures in Jewish Studies by Professor Tony Kushner and Aimee Bunting (Southampton), "Co-Presence and Performing Memory"

    Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 5:30pm. Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union. So often marked with an accusatory approach, studies of the Western Allies and the Holocaust developed late on in Holocaust historiography. Whilst there has been a defensive reaction to some of the polemical literature, the general tenor has been critical with issues of morality to the fore. The category of bystander has been widely employed to show the indifference and indeed antipathy of the liberal democracies to the plight of the Jews. By exploring the experiences of those who existed in Nazi camps such as Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen as co-presents with the Jews and other victim groups, and then as liberators in Belsen, Dachau, Buchenwald and other western camps, a more complex pattern can be detected. The best of Holocaust studies is interdisciplinary and this lecture will utilise literary and cultural approaches as well as historical to make sense of those who wrote and re-wrote their experiences as co-presents to the Shoah. The focus will be on soldiers and others from the British Empire, enabling the study of a wide range of backgrounds from across the globe, as far reaching as India and Australia, but other experiences, especially American, will also feature. The shaping and politics of memory will be at the heart of this lecture: where does the co-present exist in our complex memory of the Holocaust and how and why do we remember the Holocaust?
  • Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecture by David Crowley (Royal College of Art – London), “The Culture of Testimony in Poland after the Second World War”

    Thursday, March 31, 2016, 5:00pm. University Club President's Room, Indiana Memorial Union. Timothy Wiles Memorial Lecture by David Crowley, Head of Critical Writing in Art & Design Programme, Royal College of Art - London. Reception will follow. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Application Deadline: REEI Summer Russian Scholarship

    Thursday, March 31, 2016. The REEI Summer Russian Scholarship provides a minimum of $3000 and is awarded on a competitive basis to applicants who meet the following criteria: (1) current enrollment in a full-time undergraduate degree program, (2) current enrollment in a course of Russian language study at an institute of higher education, (3) enrollment in an 8-week course of study in Russian at the IU Summer Language Workshop in 2015, and (4) child of parents/guardians who have not received an education degree beyond a high school diploma or GED.
  • Application Deadline: Dissertation and Thesis Development Workshop: The Holocaust in the Soviet Union

    Thursday, March 31, 2016. The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum invites applications for a dissertation and thesis development workshop that is focused on the Holocaust in the Soviet Union. This workshop will be held from July 18–29, 2016 at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. This workshop will help prepare early doctoral students interested in the Holocaust in the Soviet Union for successful academic careers. Participants from North America and the former Soviet Union, with the guidance of Jeffrey Veidlinger (Joseph Brodsky Collegiate Professor of History and Judaic Studies, University of Michigan) and Mandel Center staff, will discuss pre-circulated project proposals and research strategies. Participants also will attend sessions devoted to historiography and central career development issues. In addition, participants will have ample opportunity to conduct research in the Museum’s extensive library and archival collections, which include more than 200 million pages of material in physical and digital formats.
  • Application Deadline: REEI/Mellon Faculty Grants-in-Aid of Research

    Friday, April 1, 2016. The Russian and East European Institute administers the Mellon Faculty Grants-in-Aid of Research Program funded by the REEI Mellon Endowment. Under this program, all regular Institute faculty are eligible to apply for research grants of up to $700 per year. Priority will be given to the support of innovative proposals that show clear promise of developing into research projects of major significance and ultimately attracting substantial outside funding.
  • Application Deadline: REEI/Mellon Faculty International Conference Travel Grants

    Friday, April 1, 2016. REEI has set aside special Mellon Endowment funds (up to $850 per faculty member) to assist a limited number of faculty members in traveling to conferences abroad during each academic year. Applicants should be presenting a paper or otherwise participating in the program as a chair or discussant on a panel or roundtable.
  • Application Deadline: EURO Graduate Student Professional Development Grant

    Friday, April 1, 2016. To help graduate students who require support for research travel or travel for participation in a structured academic internship program or formal language training programs. The research, internship or language program must focus on topics related to contemporary European studies or a modern European language. Research funds may be used to conduct preliminary thesis or dissertation feasibility studies or to compile evidence for their Master's thesis or dissertation. EURO research travel grants will normally not exceed $500 and international grants will normally not exceed $1000. However, additional funds may be available for short-term stays dedicated to data collection, interviews, and pre-dissertation fieldwork. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.
  • Application Deadline: EURO Graduate Student Conference Travel Grant

    Friday, April 1, 2016. To help graduate students present their research on contemporary European topics at major association meetings and conferences. Student travel reimbursement may be applied to minimum airfare or mileage (per IU guidelines), lodging, and conference registration fee. Conference travel awards will normally not exceed $350 for U.S. conferences and $500 for international conferences. A formal paper is required, and students should submit the paper and letter of acceptance with their application. No retroactive awards will be made. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.
  • Application Deadline: EURO/Mellon Travel Awards for Faculty

    Friday, April 1, 2016. Under a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, EURO has funding available to support participation in international and domestic conferences for IU Bloomington faculty presenting papers related to European Studies. Awards will not normally exceed $500 but may range from $100 to $1000. Formal papers are strongly prioritized over participation in roundtable discussions or lecture notes. Faculty who receive funding will be expected to present their research at a EURO–sponsored event following the trip. Faculty members can use the topic from their conference paper or talk about their current and future research. EURO will make room reservations and publicize the talk.
  • Application Deadline: CEUS Travel Funding

    Friday, April 1, 2016. One of the important legacies Professor Denis Sinor left to our department was the tradition of supporting graduate student travel for academic conferences. The Central Eurasian Studies Department makes available to CEUS students who have been confirmed as conference presenters awards, on a competative basis, up to $350 Awards are based on merit, demonstrated need, and availability of funds. Students applying for conference funding should submit to ACES (aces@indiana.edu) the CEUS Travel Award Application and supporting documents no later than October 1 for travel between July-March of the following year and April 1 deadline for travel between January-August of the the same year. If you have not received confirmation from the conference organizers contingency awards may be made although funds cannot be distributed until confirmation is received. Requests for travel stipends will be evaluated by an ACES Committee.
  • Application Deadline: 2016 Scholarship Grants, Polish American Arts Association of Washington, DC

    Friday, April 1, 2016. The Constitution of The Polish American Arts Association (PAAA) exhorts our organization “to support and promote the higher educational and scholastic endeavors of our youth.” In accordance with this stated Mission, the Scholarship Grant Committee announces the opening of the 17th season of the PAAA Scholarship Grant Program. New applications will be accepted from February through April 1, 2016 for a Scholarship Grant up to $3,000. Winners will be notified by the end of May, 2016 and will receive the grant at the PAAA General Membership Meeting held in May/June of the same year. There is no application fee required.
  • Submission Deadline: Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema, “Women in Cinema”

    Friday, April 1, 2016. Whilst we welcome regular submissions of individual papers for publication in volume 10 (2016), we wish to mark our birthday with a themed issue on “Women in Cinema”. The theme appears topical with the rise of the number of high-profile filmmakers and producers in recent years, but also numerous historical perspectives that offer themselves for investigation under this angle. Papers on actresses, female costume designers, women filmmakers and producers – past or present, are welcome.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: “Gender and Migration: Critical Issues and Policy Implications”

    Friday, April 1, 2016. This interdisciplinary conference is open for papers across disciplines, including, but not limited to legal studies, sociology, anthropology, economics, gender studies, cultural studies, migration studies, politics, international relations and else. The conference will explore the following themes: Mass Migration of Syrians; Gendered Causes and Implications of Migration; Home and Host Country Implications of Migration; Employment and Labour Markets in the Context of Migration; Policies; Family reunifications; Domestic Workers; Refugees and Gender; Call for revision of Convention on Asylum; Human Trafficking.
  • Conference: Annual Pitt Undergraduate Research Symposium, "Europe: East and West"

    Friday, April 1, 2016. The Undergraduate Research Symposium is an annual event since 2002 designed to provide undergraduate students, from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities, with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus.
  • International Arthouse Series presents Liza, the Fox-Fairy (Liza, a Rókatündér) (2015)

    Friday, April 1, 2016, 6:30pm and Saturday, April 2, 2016, 7:00pm. IU Cinema. Directed By: Károly Ujj Mészáros, Not Rated Comedy, Fantasy, Romance, 98 Minutes. Fox-Fairies are female demons found in Japanese folklore who seduce men and rob them of their lives. Liza is a naïve and terribly lonely nurse living in Budapest and it looks very much like she is one of them because all her potential beaus end up dying on the very first date. In Hungarian and Japanese with English subtitles. (2K DCP Presentation)
  • Central Association of Russian Teachers of America (CARTA) Annual Conference

    Friday, April 1 through Sunday, April 3, 2016. Intercontinental Hotel, Kansas City, MO. C.A.R.T.A. officially includes the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas but is open for professionals from other states. The purpose of our organization is to consolidate and coordinate the efforts of the Russian language and area studies in order to enhance and expand Russian studies in the region, provide professional and moral support for existing programs, and to create new programs of need and interest to students at all levels of public, private, secondary, and higher educational institutions. The additional benefits would be an exchange of educational programs, ideas, and techniques.
  • 1st Annual Pan-European Studies Graduate Conference, "Into the Darkness"

    Friday, April 1 through Sunday, April 3, 2016. University of Virginia (Charlottesville). While light is associated with normalcy, reason, and the order of the day, darkness means something else: marginality, irrationality, activities and discourses beyond the scope of the mainstream. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
    • Mortality and illness: death, madness, disease;
    • Darkness in the natural world: night, sky, shadows;
    • Darkness in history: war, famine, devastation, crime;
    • The Occult: the supernatural, witches, vampires, demons;
    • Dark spaces: the abyss, caverns, closets, catacombs;
    • Darkness in the arts: ink and the blank page, darkroom and photography, noir, Gothic, Romantic interiority, anti-Enlightenment;
    • Scientific darkness: dark matter, black holes, deep space, dark side of the moon;
    • Spiritual darkness: blasphemy, sin, apocalypse;
    • The subconscious: phobias, dreams, nightmares.
    The conference will be held at The University of Virginia from April 1-3, 2016. Please send any questions and submit all abstracts to pan.euro.gradconference@gmail.com by January 31, 2016.
  • Conference: "Anti-Zionism, Antisemitism, and the Dynamics of Delegitimization: An International Scholars Conference"

    Saturday through Wednesday, April 2-6, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. This conference will aim to explore the thinking that informs contemporary anti- Zionism and to clarify the ties such thinking may have with antisemitism and broader ideological, political, and cultural currents of thought. For a full description, please click here to visit the conference website, or visit our Academic Opportunities page.
  • Conference: MACES Graduate Student Mid-Atlantic Conference for Eurasian Studies, “Transnational Flows in the Eurasian Space”

    Saturday, April 2, 2016. George Washington University (DC). The Graduate Student Mid-Atlantic Conference for Eurasian Studies (MACES) aims to provide a public platform for rising experts in the field of Eurasian studies, further multidisciplinary academic discourse on Eurasia, and connect interdisciplinary student bodies. This year’s conference theme is “Transnational Flows in the Eurasian Space”. In modern Eurasia, the movement of people, wealth, and ideas across national borders is deeply shaped by the culture, politics, and economics of the region. Through understanding these movements, the conference seeks to shed light on the dynamism of Eurasian space. Participants are invited to explore any aspect of transnational flows in the region. For the purposes of the conference, “Eurasian space” is defined as post-Soviet space, Eastern Europe, Turkey, and Mongolia.
  • Polish Board Game Night

    Monday, April 4, 2016, 6:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 1134. Polish Board Game Night. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact polish@indiana.edu with any questions.
  • Submission Deadline: Forum for Modern Language Studies Prize – “Ecologies”

    Monday, April 4, 2016. The field of ecocriticism is of increasing interest to many scholars of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures across a broad range of historical, geographical and generic contexts far beyond the mostly anglophone examples of nature writing or environmentalist non-fiction on which it initially focused. Looking beyond sentimental representations of the natural world, ecocritical reading seeks to respond to our contemporary sense of environmental catastrophe by critically re-examining cultural constructions and discourses which are ecological in the broadest sense, dealing with the relationship and interactions between organisms, their environment and each other. Alongside the vibrant developments in research across the field, recent years have seen ecocritical questions addressed in a wide range of university courses, offering students an opportunity to make connections between work in the arts and humanities, and the environmental debates which are omnipresent in public, political and media discourse. Ecocriticism is also inherently interdisciplinary, encompassing fields such as political science, geography, philosophy and economics, as well as research areas such as post-colonial and gender studies; it is also proving central to more recent scholarly interest in affect, hybridity and animal theory. Please click here to visit the website and get complete details.
  • Conference: International Workshop on Critical Approaches to Irregular Migration Facilitation: Dismantling the Human Smuggler Narrative

    Tuesday and Wednesday, April 5-6, 2016. European University Institute (Florence, Italy). In contemporary mainstream narratives of migration, the human smuggler has earned a privileged if infamous spot as one of the most widely recognized and despised global predators. Smugglers are often referred to as orchestrators of senseless human tragedies along migration corridors, masterminds behind sexual exploitation rings, or amassers of untold riches made at the expense of asylum seekers, migrants and their families -in turn often narrowly portrayed as infantile and ignorant. Constructed as racialized, hypersexual and greedy males from the global South, facilitators of irregular migration have earned widespread notoriety in narratives of human and national security, particularly in the context of migration control efforts. Scholarship on the facilitation of irregular migration often draws from the experiences of law enforcement or of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, especially those who have been the target of threats, scams or violence, further obscuring the perspectives of those playing a role in their transits (often migrants and asylum seekers themselves). As a result, our knowledge of irregular migration facilitation is often plagued with fragmented perspectives on the socio-cultural dynamics of the migratory journey, the facilitator-traveler relationship and their community dimensions. Simultaneously, there is a growing corpus of empirical and critical work on the facilitation or brokerage of irregular migration within migration regimes that deserves to be fostered and strengthened. With that goal in mind we invite abstracts on the theme of irregular migration/ human mobility facilitation for an international workshop to be held on April 5-6, 2016 at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. We seek critical and empirical engagements on the topic of the facilitation and brokerage of irregular migration as witnessed regionally and comparatively. Aware of the multiple processes involved in the facilitation of irregular migration efforts, facilitation is broadly conceived to include those who may not be explicitly recognized as facilitators/smugglers, but who also develop paths conducive to human mobility that takes place outside of legal/ized and/or state sponsored mechanisms.
  • Nick Stargardt (Oxford), "Germans at War"

    Friday, April 8, 2016, 12:00pm. Persimmon Room, Indiana Memorial Union. European History Workshop. The paper is precirculated and available on Oncourse. If you don’t have access to the EHW Oncourse site, please email Roberta Pergher (rpergher@indiana.edu) and she will send you the paper.
  • IU Medieval Studies Symposium, “Medieval Globalisms: Movement in the Global Middle Ages”

    Friday and Saturday, April 8-9, 2016. Indiana University Bloomington. The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals dealing with any aspect of Medieval Globalisms: movement, discourse, and cultural exchange. Scholars have rigorously interrogated modern models of globalism, but what does "global" mean for the Middle Ages? This symposium aims to identify the global perspectives that emerged in this period in which people, ideas, and objects traversed the globe through travel, trade, war, and exodus, and to explore the larger geographic context in which the Middle Ages occurred. In addition to the geographic, papers might explore studies of medieval conceptions of the globe and its relation to the self. Rather than viewing medieval places through the model of center and periphery, we ask participants to consider a de-centered medieval globe in which no one locale is given preference over another and to envision the period as a time of dynamic cross-cultural interactions. We encourage proposals about texts, traditions, and localities outside of traditional, Eurocentric medieval studies. Topics include, but are not limited to: Movement of Objects and People; Epidemics and Disease Transmission, Trade Networks; Reception and Translation of Texts across Cultures; Exoticism and Fetishization; Medieval Conceptions of Geography and Mapping; Ocean and Environmental Studies; Cosmopolitanism and Urban Centers; Diplomacy, Tribute, and Gift-Giving; Linguistic Interactions; Local and Global Knowledges; Alternative Conceptions of the Self and Otherness; Universalizing Medieval Historiography; Travel Narratives and Pilgrimage Literature; Encyclopedism and Technical Writing; Scientific and Medical Knowledge; Pedagogy and Teaching Globalisms; Religion and Religious Minorities.
  • Conference: Yale University Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference, “Cold War Narratives Reimagined”

    Friday and Saturday, April 8-9, 2016. Yale University (New Haven, CT). The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University is pleased to announce “Cold War Narratives Reimagined,” an interdisciplinary graduate conference on April 8-9, 2016. More than twenty-five years after the end of the Cold War, scholars are able to refocus, recast, and reevaluate the discussions centered on this period of global tension, military non-conflict and cultural polarization. Whether within the United States or in the international arena, it is typified by physical and imagined borders, walls, spheres of influence and missile gaps. This conference seeks to engage with these physical and symbolic spaces, to challenge the East-West dichotomy in Cold War narratives, and to examine what happens after these zones and margins dissolve. “Cold War Narratives Reimagined” is an interdisciplinary conference that centers on the intellectual, cultural, and environmental legacies of the Cold War era in the United States and in the former Soviet Union, both those of its immediate aftermath and of contemporary reframings of these legacies. Please see the info sheet or contact yalecoldwarconference@gmail.com for more details.
  • Conference: "RED ON RED: A Symposium on Post-Socialist Art and Critical Theory"

    Friday and Saturday, April 8-9, 2016. Yale University (New Haven, CT). A discernable boom in politically engaged, leftist art practices and critical theory is underway in Eastern Europe and Russia, China, and in post-socialist countries of the Global South. This boom defies all expectations, emerging after the depoliticizing “transitions” to capitalism of the 1990s and the seemingly reactionary historical moment. Activists and art collectives, critics, poets, grassroots filmmakers, and video, performance and digital artists of all stripes are seeking alternative spaces for engaged aesthetic experimentation. In many cases, these aesthetic producers return to the emancipatory promises of earlier political and aesthetic experiments, reimagining them for the digital age. Setting in conversation researchers in Slavic, East German, East Asian, and Global South Studies at Yale and elsewhere, Red on Red seeks to establish a deeper and more transnational understanding of these recent aesthetic and political developments. While many of these aesthetic movements have a strong media presence in their native countries, they tend to be poorly known in other areas of the post-socialist world or in an international academic context. By fostering cross-linguistic dialogue, this project fills a gap in these various movements’ awareness of each other, as well as in their interdisciplinary study as a world phenomenon. Rather than merely apply Western analytic frameworks to these movements, Red on Red develops new kinds of critical and aesthetic theory that are inherently grounded in a post-socialist context. Taking its cue from Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Provincializing Europe, it asks what alternatives the utopian and dystopian spaces of post-socialist art can provide to traditional Western notions of progress, freedom, and history.
  • 2016 Midwest Slavic Conference

    Friday, April 8 through Sunday, April 10, 2016. The Ohio State University (Columbus). Each year the Midwest Slavic Association and CSEES partner together to host the Midwest Slavic Conference. The conference has been held on the OSU campus since 2003 and is normally held in the spring. Participation is open to undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars from across the United States and abroad. Approximately 30 panels are held each year with over 250 attendees from institutions throughout the country and internationally. Conference events include a keynote address, reception, and panels covering film, political science, culture, history, linguistics, and many other disciplines and that focus on all countries and regions of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Knowledge Bank is a digital repository maintained by OSU's University Libraries. Conference participants can elect to have their abstracts, papers, and PowerPoints included in Knowledge Bank. Within Knowledge Bank, CSEES has created a community for the Midwest Slavic Conference that contains programs and participants' materials. Knowledge Bank is accessible through the University Libraries' website and is open to everyone, including those not affiliated with OSU. Papers are searchable and downloadable, helping to increase the impact of the conference and providing a way to spread participants' work.
  • Guest Conductor Marzio Conti (Oviedo Philharmonic), “Rachmaninoff and Sibelius”

    Tuesday, April 12, 2016, 8:00pm. Musical Arts Center. Music Director of the Oviedo Philharmonic (OFIL) in Spain since 2011, Marzio Conti has earned recognition and the acclaim of audiences and critics for his achievements in guiding the orchestra to new artistic heights. He has earned numerous awards and has been named a juror for the arts prize of the prestigious Premios Asturias. This season brought a major critical success with a recording of the complete symphonic works of Saint-Saens for Warner Classic. This year, he will record the music of De Falla and Turina for Decca. At the community level, Mr. Conti has earned praise for his special projects at local centers and for a joint venture with the University of Oviedo to offer films with music, services for families, musical projects related to sports and outdoor summer events designed to spotlight historic parts of the city. Since his arrival in Oviedo, the symphonic season of OFIL has established a standard of excellence for the musical world of Spain, presenting notable artists such as Midori, Christian Zimermann, Gregory Kunde, Elina Garanca, Elisso Vissaladze, Sabine Mayer, Cecilia Bartoli, Natalia Gutman, Rudolf Buchbinder, Katia and Marielle Lebeque, Grigory Sokolov and as hosts to the London Philharmonic Orchestra (Salonen), St. Petersburg Philharmonic (Gergiev), Gothenburg Symphony (Dudamel), and Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique (Gardiner). Repertoire: Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 30 | Sibelius: Symphony No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 82
  • Conference: 23rd International Conference of Europeanists, "Resilient Europe?"

    Thursday, April 14 through Saturday, April 16, 2016. Philadelphia, PA. The Program Committee for the 23rd International Conference of Europeanists invites participants to consider contemporary Europe’s capacity for resilience. Since the financial crisis began in 2008, stresses and shocks of various sorts have posed dilemmas that challenge Europe’s resilience in economic, political, and cultural domains. How will European economies confront slow growth and austerity, as well as the atrophy of “social Europe” and the growth of inequality? How will demographic decline combined with immigration and assimilation affect the ethnic composition of Europe? Will the protracted Eurozone crisis and waning public support for European institutions and policies alter the viability of the European project? How will secular Europe confront the challenges of religious mobilization? How will European democracies confront the rise of nationalist parties and the valorization of “illiberalism” as viable political practice? Can Europe remain a “Normative Power,” a force for liberalism, democracy and the rule of law in the world, in the face of rising powers and resurgent authoritarianism?
  • Conference: 21st Annual World Convention of the Association for the Study of Nationalities

    Thursday, April 14 through Saturday, April 16, 2016. Columbia University (NY). The ASN Convention, the largest international and inter-disciplinary scholarly gathering of its kind, welcomes proposals on a wide range of topics related to nationalism, ethnicity, ethnic conflict and national identity in regional sections on the Balkans, Central Europe, Russia, Ukraine, Eurasia, the Caucasus, and Turkey/Greece, as well as thematic sections on Nationalism and Migration/Diasporas. Disciplines represented include political science, history, anthropology, sociology, international studies, security studies, geopolitics, area studies, economics, geography, sociolinguistics, literature, psychology, and related fields.
  • Conference: KFLC, "The Languages, Literatures and Cultures Conference"

    Thursday, April 14 through Saturday, April 16, 2016. University of Kentucky (Lexington). Please consider submitting a paper or panel proposal to the annual KFLC: The Languages, Literatures and Cultures Conference (April 14-16, 2016), now in its 69th year at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Papers on any aspect of Slavic/Eastern European culture, literature, language, linguistics (theoretical or applied), folklore, or language pedagogy are most welcome. The KFLC hosts approximately 800 attendees each year who enjoy a congenial and intellectually engaging atmosphere at a lovely time of year in the Bluegrass.
  • Application Deadline: Galina Starovoitova Fellowship on Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (Russian citizens only)

    Friday, April 15, 2016. In keeping with both the legacies of Woodrow Wilson and Galina Starovoitova, the Starovoitova Fellowship is available to scholars, policy makers, journalists, civic activists, and other engaged persons who successfully bridge the worlds of ideas and public affairs to advance human rights and conflict resolution. Possible research areas include: rule of law issues; human rights; ethnic, religious, racial and cultural policies; conflict resolution; development of democratic institutions; promotion of civil society; development of civic education and related cultural issues; nation-building; nationalism and xenophobia; tolerance; the free press. Applicants with substantial experience from a wide variety of backgrounds (including academia, government, the corporate world, the professions, NGOs, the media) are eligible for appointment. All applicants are required to have a working knowledge of English. For academic participants, eligibility is limited to the postdoctoral level, and normally it is expected that academic candidates will have demonstrated their scholarly development by publication beyond the Kandidat dissertation. For other applicants, an equivalent level of professional achievement is expected.
  • Application Deadline: 2016 Summer Research Laboratory on Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia

    Friday, April 15, 2016. The Summer Research Laboratory (SRL) on Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia is open to all scholars with research interests in the Russian, East European and Eurasian region for eight weeks during the summer months from June 13 until August 6. The SRL provides scholars access to the resources of the University of Illinois Slavic collection within a flexible time frame where scholars have the opportunity to seek advice and research support from the librarians of the Slavic Reference Service (SRS). The deadline for grant funding is April 15 and is fast approaching! REEEC will continue to receive applications for the Summer Research Lab after the grant deadline, but housing and travel funds will not be guaranteed. For graduate students, the SRL provides an opportunity to conduct research prior to going abroad and extra experience to refine research skills. Students will also have the opportunity of seeking guidance from specialized librarians skilled in navigating resources pertaining to and originating from Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. The SRS is an extensive service that provides access to a wide range of materials that center on and come from: Russia, the Former Soviet Union, Czech and Slovak Republics, Former Yugoslavia, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania. The International & Area Studies Library, where the Slavic reference collections are housed, contains work stations for readers, research technologies, a collection of authoritative reference works, and provides unlimited access to one of the largest collections for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies in North America.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: The 10th Joint Conference of Bulgarian and North American Scholars, "Beyond the Borders"

    Friday, April 15, 2016. For more than forty years the tradition of Bulgarian-American academic dialogs has been carried on by the Council for Bulgarian Studies Abroad at the Bulgarian Academy of Science and the Bulgarian Studies Association. The first conference was in 1973 in Madison, WI, followed by conferences in Varna (1978), Boston (1982), Smoljan (1987), Pittsburgh (1994), Blagoevgrad (1999), Columbus, OH (2003), Varna (2008), and Eugene, OR (2012). It is Sofia’s turn to host the 2016 Bulgarian-Northern American conference in the field of Bulgarian Studies. The topic of this conference, “Beyond the Borders”, invites various perceptions of “borders” (disciplinary, historical, cultural, national, etc.) and their interpretation as liminal spaces of distancing, interaction and transformation.
  • Deadline for Proposals: PIASA's 7th Annual Conference

    Friday, April 15, 2016. The Polish Institute of Arts & Sciences of America is pleased to invite proposals for PIASA’s 74th Annual Conference to be held in Washington, DC, June 16-18, 2016. Proposals are solicited for complete sessions or individual papers in any of the disciplines in the liberal arts, sciences, or business/economics. Since the Institute values comparative sessions, individual papers need not focus on Poland or the Polish diaspora, but it is hoped that at least one paper in each session will do so. Sessions including presenters from more than one nation are encouraged. It is expected that acceptable conference papers will be submitted for possible publication in The Polish Review subsequent to the conference. To submit a paper or complete session, please send the name, e-mail address, institutional affiliation, a tentative paper title and brief abstract (one short paragraph is OK) for all presenters to the chair of the program committee at jpula@pnc.edu.
  • International Symposium “Education and social inequality,” XVII April International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development

    Tuesday, April 19 through Thursday, April 21, 2016. National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia). The Symposium will generate a scholarly discussion on education and social inequality, considering how educational systems respond to social inequality and other forms of social stratification. Conference participants are invited to address the theme of social inequality in and through education from perspectives of their various disciplines, theoretical and pragmatic standpoints and geographic locations. The Symposium will be one of the major streams of a larger conference held at the HSE University annually, the International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development. The Conference attracts distinguished scholars in social and behavioral sciences from Russia, Europe, Asia, and America. About 1500 scholars usually participate The plenary sessions and special round tables feature senior Russian Government officials, high-level representatives of the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the CEOs of the largest Russian and international companies.
  • XVII April International Academic Conference on Economic and Social Development

    Tuesday, April 19 through Friday, April 22, 2016. National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia). The April Conference of the HSE is the main forum in Russia on social sciences, first of all, in Economics. Last years about 1500 colleagues participated in these Conferences. Special topics of the conference are diagnostics of economic growth: comparative perspective; top-down modernization: opportunities and limits in modern world; economic decentralization and local self-governance; values, trust and cooperation. The plenary sessions, including selected honorary papers, sessions and round tables, will be devoted to (but not restricted on) the special issues of the Conference. The plenary sessions and special round tables will feature senior Russian Government officials including representatives of the Presidential Administration, high-level representatives of the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the CEOs of several largest Russian and international companies. Session meetings and round tables on the problems of economic and social development will be held after the plenary sessions. The Conference Program Committee is chaired by Professor Evgeny Yasin. Working languages of the Conference are Russian and English. Simultaneous translation will be available during all plenary and some session meetings.
  • Conference: "From Oikonomia to Occupy: Intersections of the Religious and the Economic," A Graduate Student Symposium

    Thursday and Friday, April 21-22, 2016. University of Toronto (Canada). Economic and religious imaginaries often merge in ways that affect how societies and individuals operate. Relations of power, hierarchies of knowledge, and the circulation of ideas are all entangled intersections between the religious and the economic, affecting the social and the political. In the social sciences and in the humanities, the idea of the “neoliberal” now rivals most any other reasoning behind the forces of social and political change. From anthropological study of debt forgiveness in the Occupy Movement, to historical analysis of Roman economies in early Christianity, scholarship across disciplines is beginning to recognize the longstanding relation between religious and economic forms. In response, this graduate student symposium brings together research into how religions and economies overlap and co-constitute social and political worlds. How have different religious traditions engaged with the economic through history? Have contemporary economic practices, such as banking, consuming, and selling, conditioned the maintenance of religious sites? What are the implications of thinking religion through the purview of critical economic theory? What, indeed, are the practical implications for scholarship in light of global political economies in crisis? In this conference, we will address constellations of the economic and religious in ways that crack open the deceptively isolated worlds of political economy and religion in the public sphere. We invite early career scholars and graduate students to explore the entangled production, circulation, and exchanges between the religious and the economic.
  • Contemporary Post-Yugoslav Cinema presents White, White World (Beli, Beli Svet) (2010)

    Monday, April 25, 2016, 7:00pm. IU Cinema. Directed By: Oleg Novković, Not Rated Drama, 121 Minutes. Set in the dying city of Bor, a mining town in Serbia’s version of the Rust Belt, Novković’s film has been likened to a modern Greek tragedy in which “characters sing, but never dance.” In a post-industrial landscape, a Balkan tango of love and death develops, as petty thieves, abandoned lovers, and other peripheral characters tossed aside by the post-socialist transition connect in the only thing they still possess: a passoniate, inalianable desire for life itself. In Serbian with English subtitles. Please note: contains mature content, including drug usage, nudity, and strong language. Producer Milena Trobozic Garfield is scheduled to be present. (Digital)
  • Application Deadline: Alexander Herzen Junior Fellowships 2016/2017

    Thursday, April 28, 2016. This program aims to support excellent young researchers in the humanities and social sciences from the Siberian, Ural and Far-Eastern federal districts, and the Voronezh, Lipetsk, Belgorod, Ryazan and Kaluga regions. Research topics related to the IWM main research fields are highly encouraged (http://www.iwm.at/research/). Fellows will be invited to spend a six-month research term at the IWM between July 2016 and June 2017 and receive a stipend to cover all expenses related to their stay in Vienna. They will work on their own research projects while staying in residence at the IWM in Vienna. The IWM provides fellows with an office incl. access to internet, in-house research and administrative facilities as well as other services free of charge. For additional information see: www.iwm.at/fellowships/herzen or http://www.prokhorovfund.ru/projects/contest/157/.
  • International Arthouse Series presents 11 Minutes (11 Minut) (2015)

    Friday, April 29, 2016, 6:30pm and Saturday, April 30, 2016, 7:00pm. IU Cinema. Directed By: Jerzy Skolimowski, Not Rated Drama (Thriller), 81 Minutes. A cross-section of contemporary urbanites’ lives and loves intertwine, including a jealous husband out of control, his sexy actress wife, a sleazy Hollywood director, a reckless drug messenger, a disoriented young woman, an ex-con hot-dog vendor, a troubled student on a mysterious mission, a high-rise window cleaner on an illicit break, an elderly sketch artist, a hectic paramedics team, and a group of hungry nuns. All of them live in an unsure world where anything could happen at any time. An unexpected chain of events can seal many fates in a mere 11 minutes. In Polish and English with English subtitles. (2K DCP Presentation)
  • Regular Proposal Deadline: 11th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Science

    Monday, May 2, 2016. "We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, virtual lightning talks, virtual posters, or colloquia addressing one of the following themes: Social and Community Studies; Civic and Political Studies; Cultural Studies; Global Studies; Environmental Studies; Organizational Studies; Educational Studies; Communication. Special Focus for 2016: 'An Age and its Ends: Social Science in the Era of the Anthropocene.'"
  • 31st Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference

    Friday and Saturday, May 6-7, 2016. University of Chicago (IL). We invite graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars from a broad range of disciplines to submit proposals on any topic concerning the Middle East and Islamic world from the advent of Islam to the present day. Disciplinary focuses include but are not limited to: history, sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, literature, philosophy, art history, cinema and media studies, gender studies, and diaspora studies. As in previous years, two of our sponsors are offering limited funding to support special panels in the following fields: (1) modern Arabic literature and (2) Central Eurasian studies. Participants chosen for one of these panels may be eligible for a modest travel subsidy. Those interested should submit their abstracts with a note indicating their interest in being a part of one of these sponsored panels. Applicants not placed on a special panel will still receive full consideration for the general conference.
  • American Friends of Russian Folklore Expeditions to Rural Russia

    Summer 2016. Places are now available on folklore-collecting expeditions to four regions of rural Russia in Bryansk province, Smolensk province, Irkutsk province and the Kamchatka peninsula. The expeditions are led by Dr. Yelena Minyonok of the Gorky Institute of World Literature, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. The focus will be on documenting traditional songs, music, and seasonal rituals, along with immigrant narratives and narratives of the supernatural. These expeditions provide unusual access to rural Russia and Russian folklore. Established scholars and beginning students are equally welcome. Expedition languages are Russian and English. Participants pay their own way plus a share of the expedition expenses. The expeditions are sponsored by American Friends of Russian Folklore, a 501(c)3 nonprofit registered in the state of California. Expedition dates: Investigating Double-Faith in Russian, May 7-18; Investigating Double-Faith in Russian Folklore, June 16-29; Documenting the History of Cossack Settlers in the Far East, July 1-15; Dynamics of Folklore Traditions, July 22-August 3.
  • Conference: “Gender and Migration: Critical Issues and Policy Implications”

    Wednesday through Saturday, May 11-14, 2016. Izmir, Turkey. This interdisciplinary conference is open for papers across disciplines, including, but not limited to legal studies, sociology, anthropology, economics, gender studies, cultural studies, migration studies, politics, international relations and else. The conference will explore the following themes: Mass Migration of Syrians; Gendered Causes and Implications of Migration; Home and Host Country Implications of Migration; Employment and Labour Markets in the Context of Migration; Policies; Family reunifications; Domestic Workers; Refugees and Gender; Call for revision of Convention on Asylum; Human Trafficking.
  • Conference: Princeton Conjunction 2016, “Imperial Reverb: Exploring the Postcolonies of Communism”

    Friday through Sunday, May 13-15, 2016. Princeton University (NJ). This interdisciplinary conference aims to review successes and failures of the dialogue between the postcolonial theory and postcommunist studies, which has been taking place in the former socialist countries. We invite scholars to approach the alleged postcolonial condition of postcommunist Europe and Eurasia not only as a break from the colonial past, but also as a method of retrospective reflection, and a form of an intellectual exchange. To what extent can postcolonial studies of the communist experiment be seen as a product of intellectual transfer or conceptual mimicry? Do those studies merely graft the postcolonial argumentation and narration developed for the diverse cases of South Asia, Latin America, or South Africa onto the no less diverse traditions, experiences, and concerns of postcommuinist societies? Given the impact that Marxism in general and the work of Antonio Gramsci in particular had on the formation of postcolonial theory, how should we interpret the wholesale rejection of the leftist legacy by postcolonial scholarship in the region? Why do the anticolonial studies produced in, and of the region tend to privilege the history of the national elites, marginalizing even further the experience of the colonized and the suppressed? What are the analytical and interpretive benefits and pitfalls of postcolonial anti-communism that has been emerging gradually after the collapse of communism? Will political conservatism, aesthetic traditionalism, and romantic nationalism remain the key contributions of this anti-communist postcoloniality?
  • Deadline for Abstracts: "Crime and Punishment at 150"

    Sunday, May 15, 2016. The publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866 was a watershed moment in the history of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Dostoevsky’s novel perennially hovers near the top of lists of “Best Books of All Time.” Harold Bloom summed up the work’s enduring mastery and appeal, observing that, “Crime and Punishment remains the best of all murder stories, a century and a third after its publication. We have to read it — though it is harrowing — because, like Shakespeare, it alters our consciousness.” In the twenty first century, media and technology advances have transformed the reading experience and the ways readers relate to texts. Most students in literature classrooms are now digital natives, many reading on e-devices, some even on smart phones. In the age of the “spoiler alert” our reading experience seems to have changed beyond all recognition, yet in some ways the possibilities of new reading communities opened up by social media allow us to replicate the kinds of institutional communities which arose around nineteenth-century Russian periodicals. Rethinking the ways in which we contextualize, teach, and interpret Dostoevsky’s novel will help make it more accessible to a new generation of readers.

    “Crime and Punishment at 150” will celebrate the novel’s sesquicentenary by bringing together teachers, scholars, students, translators, artists, and readers to discuss Dostoevsky in the digital age. The conference will include a keynote by Carol Apollonio, a screening of the new film Crime and Punishment (Apocalypse Films, 2015) with post-film discussion with its director, Andrew O’Keefe, and a video conference with a linked Crime and Punishment panel at the University of Bristol, among other events. Confirmed participants include Brian Armstrong, Elena Baraban, Alexander Burry, Deborah Martinsen, Louise McReynolds, Robin Feuer Miller, Megan Swift, and William Mills Todd, III.

    We invite abstracts of 300 words on topics related to Crime and Punishment in the classroom or digital humanities/new media approaches to Crime and Punishment. Possible topics include:

    • reading Dostoevsky with students in 2016
    • digital humanities-based research on Dostoevsky and/or Crime and Punishment
    • digital or new media approaches to the novel in the classroom
    • new approaches to teaching an old book
    • public engagement initiatives (book club readings, online readings, Twitter projects)
    • teaching the novel in different contexts (a survey course, a Dostoevsky course, across disciplines)
    • the challenges and successes of teaching the novel in the context of decreasing enrolments and increasing departmental pressures

    We also encourage students to submit abstracts and we plan to feature several panels showcasing undergraduate and graduate student research. We welcome 300 word abstracts for papers on Crime and Punishment from undergraduate and graduate students, particularly those that explore new ways of reading the novel through the lens of new media or against the backdrop of contemporary issues and experiences.

    Please submit 300 word abstracts with a 1 page cv to candpat150@gmail.com by May 15, 2016.

    This event is co-organized by Katherine Bowers and Kate Holland, and supported by the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies (UBC), Green College (UBC), and the North American Dostoevsky Society.

  • First Conference on Food Culture in Central Europe From the Nineteenth Century to the Present Day

    Thursday and Friday, May 19-20, 2016. University of Social Sciences and Humanities (Warsaw, Poland). Food Culture in Central Europe (Austria, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Russia Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine) is a multidisciplinary conference that aiming to present food studies related researches from Central Europe. The boundaries marked in conference title are not geographical nor political – they are symbolic. They present spaces and food cultures not known to wider audience. We hope that this initiative will increase level of food culture awareness, create interdisciplinary discourse on the food studies in this region and help establish long term cooperation between researchers and institutions. Food culture is changing constantly. New culinary techniques, oversea products and foreigner food ways. The political, social and cultural changes have also an impact on what we eat. In the age of mass media development or decay of food culture is even faster then in the past.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: 6th Annual Islamic Studies Graduate Conference, "Identity, Memory, and Diasporas"

    Friday through Sunday, May 20-22, 2016. University of California, Santa Barbara. Keynote Speaker: Sherman A. Jackson, University of Southern California. The external and internal frontiers and definition of Islam are constantly being contested and negotiated, particularly through the movements of diaspora communities. When individuals and groups move from one place to another, how do identity and memory affect their understanding of origin and destination? What kind of communal practices do they retain, acquire or exchange, and what factors influence these decisions? To what extent do they maintain ties to their previous Islamic communities, and what does this suggest about the process of identity formation and preservation within diaspora groups? This conference hopes to interrogate the relationships inherent to identity formation, diaspora, and migration of Muslim communities, understood both in terms of geographies and abstract communal concepts. The theme aims to explore the diverse manifestations of identity, pluralities of religious content, patterns of diaspora, and ways in which memory is preserved in private and public practice. We invite a diverse array of proposals from graduate students of all academic disciplines at U.S. and international colleges and universities. Proposals that employ interdisciplinary methodologies are encouraged. Possible topics include but are not limited to: communal practices, rituals, and aesthetic expressions of belonging within diaspora groups; the effects of diaspora on textual translation, interpretation, and communication; memory formation and cultural appropriation within diaspora communities, including shared narratives, nostalgia, and adaptation; constructions and transformations of spaces and built environments (real and imagined) by diaspora groups; implications of residency, social status, and labor for the identity of diaspora populations; intercommunity connectivity, including through foodways; the politics of Muslim diasporas.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: “Vladimir Nabokov and the Fictions of Memory”

    Monday, May 30, 2016. The University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland would like to invite proposals for presentations at an international conference devoted to the problem of memory in the works of Vladimir Nabokov. The conference will take place on 22-23 September 2016 in Warsaw. Almost 40 years after Nabokov’s death his texts continue to function as literary Fabergé eggs in which scholars keep finding hidden surprises and previously overlooked details. As Nabokov wrote in Conclusive Evidence, “the unravelling of a riddle is the purest and most basic act of the human mind.” However, readers and critics are divided on the issue of whether Nabokov is a postmodern riddle-maker enjoying the game itself without enabling the player to reach the ultimate solution, or whether the riddles are solvable by a reader astute enough to follow all the sophisticated patterns and allusions which point to Nabokov’s metaphysical convictions. One of the greatest riddles of Nabokov’s art is memory. From his very first poems and his first novel Mary to the unfinished manuscript of The Original of Laura, Nabokov’s writings abound in characters haunted by their past. This preoccupation is not simply a feature of loss and nostalgia characteristic of emigrant experience in general, but an attempt to examine the mechanisms which control the functions of human consciousness. While Nabokov explores his own remembrances, transferring his experiences to the characters of his fictions, it is never entirely clear how much of what is being recalled is in fact a construct of the imagination. Memory becomes an obsession for many of Nabokov’s heroes, who may often be described as mnemonic deviants, their crimes resulting from a falsified perception of reality which they constantly filter through the lenses of the past. Conversely, there are characters ennobled by their devotion to every fleeting detail of their existence, whether past or present. What is the function of memory in Nabokov’s texts? Is Nabokov really interested in objectively recalling the past or would it be more apt to say that he artfully constructs remembrance in order to deal with trauma, loss and disappointment? To what extent is the past reshaped through literary models and intertextual props? Does the past control us, as in Freud’s theories, detested and summarily dismissed by Nabokov, or is it possible to control the workings of memory and manipulate it in literary discourse?

    We invite presentations addressing the following, and related, issues in the context of Nabokov’s works:

    • fictitious biographies and autobiographical writings
    • forgetfulness vs. memories of loss and trauma
    • emigrant experience: nostalgia and the traps of memory
    • memory as fabulation, memory as narrative
    • speaking memory, memory and delusion
    • memory and philosophy
    • memory and psychoanalysis
    • narration(s) of the mind
    • visual memory (cinematography, photography)
    • anticipatory memory, proleptic memory and “future recollection”
    • return to/of the past in Nabokov’s poetry
    • bilingualism and remembrance
    • comparative perspectives
    • memory in political contexts: Revolution, exile, repatriation
    • synesthetic metamorphoses:
      • trivialities, souvenirs, memories
      • symbolic correspondences
      • realities beyond appearance
    • Nabokovian allusions, echoes and inspirations.

    We invite proposals of individual 20 minute papers or 3-paper panels. Please submit proposals (up to 400 words) by 30/05/2016 to the organizers: Dr. Mikołaj Wiśniewski, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, mwisniewski@swps.edu.pl; Dr. Irena Księżopolska, Independent Scholar, iksiezopolska@swps.edu.pl.

    The languages of the conference are English and Russian.

  • Proposal Deadline: Canadian Association of Slavists Annual Conference

    Monday through Wednesday, May 30 - June 1, 2016. University of Calgary (AB, Canada). The annual conference of the Canadian Association of Slavists (CAS) will take place at the University of Calgary, in Canada’s most dynamic city set against the spectacular backdrop of the Rocky Mountains and Banff National Park. The CAS Annual Conference is held as a part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences with more than 70 national associations in attendance. The theme of the 2016 Congress is "Energizing Communities.” You can find out more details here. This year, CAS overlaps with: Linguistics, Comparative Literature, Hungarian Studies, Study of Religion, Theatre Research, Women’s and Gender Studies, Study of Education and Higher Education, Applied Theatre, Jewish Studies, History, Translation Studies, Sociology, Political Science, Film Studies, and Church History. Proposals for interdisciplinary panels with other associations are very welcome. They are always a highlight at the CAS conference. Additional funding from the Federation is available for such panels. Please do not hesitate to contact the Program Chair, Bohdan Harasymiw, bharasym@ucalgary.ca for assistance or information. Proposals are invited for individual papers, panels, roundtable discussions and graduate student activities. Complete panels are preferred. Forms for panel, roundtable and individual proposals are available on the CAS website. Further information can be found on the Call for Papers.
  • Call for Papers: X International Academic Conference Tolstoy and World Literature

    Wednesday, June 1, 2016. 11-15 августа 2016 года «Музей-усадьба Л. Н. Толстого «Ясная Поляна» проводит X Международную научную конференцию «Лев Толстой и мировая литература». На заседаниях конференции будут обсуждаться проблемы творчества писателя в контексте русской и мировой литературы, философии, религии. Конференция традиционно проходит на базе личной библиотеки Л. Н. Толстого, в которой хранятся книги на 39 иностранных языках. По итогам конференции издается сборник статей. Регистрационный взнос участника – 50 евро. Музей покрывает расходы по проживанию, питанию и культурной программе. Заезд участников 11 августа, в 15 часов, от метро Ак. Янгеля, отъезд 15 августа 2016 года, в 10 утра. Заявки на участие в конференции принимаются до 1 июня 2016 года. Заявка включает информацию об участнике и тезисы выступления. Для получения приглашения для визы необходимо до 15 февраля 2016 года прислать копию первой страницы паспорта, информацию о работе, месте жительства, адрес, телефон и город, в котором участник будет обращаться за визой. Заявки направлять Галине Алексеевой: gala@tgk.tolstoy.ru телефоны: (48751)76-1-41, +7-910-944-5899.

    [On August 11-15, 2016 the State Museum-Estate of Leo Tolstoy at Yasnaya Polyana is going to host X International Academic Conference Tolstoy and World Literature. Problems of Tolstoy’s work and art in the context of Russian and World Literature, philosophy, and religion are to be discussed at the sessions of the Conference. Traditionally the Conference is organised on the basis of Tolstoy’s personal library, which preserves the books and periodicals in 39 foreign languages. The Book of Proceedings will be published. The registration fee is 50 euro. The Museum covers all hotel, meals, and cultural programme expenses. On August 11th, at 3 pm, at the metro station Akademika Yangelya there will be a bus to Yasnaya Polyana for the participants. August 15th is the departure day. The deadline for applications is June 1st, 2016. The application includes the information about the participant and the abstract of the paper. For those who need an invitation for visa, the following information is to be sent before February 15th: the copy of the front passport page, institution, address, telephone, place of issuing visa. Please forward your application to Galina Alekseeva: gala@tgk.tolstoy.ru or galalexeeva@tula.net. Telephones: (48751)76-1-41, +7-910-944-5899 For more information, you may contact Galina Alekseeva or Donna Orwin at donna.orwin@utoronto.ca.]
  • Conference: 5th Bi-annual EAM Congress (European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies)

    Wednesday, June 1 through Friday, June 3, 2016. University of Rennes (France). The fifth EAM congress invites scholars to consider the coupling of the notions of quest and investigation in works of art or movements of the avant-garde or neo-avant-garde, or of the various forms of modernism, even though modernism and the avant-garde seem often to have been constructed in opposition to the spiritual or scientific heritage suggested by these two terms. The notion of quest suggests a metaphysical beyond informed by mysticism, implying the absence of an end or of a conclusion, whereas the notion of investigation implies a totally rational conception of reality and a process likely to bring a definite result and reach a conclusion. Coupling the two notions, quest/investigation, is therefore an invitation to overcome an initial paradox: the endlessness of the quest as opposed to the fixed scope of the investigation. The co-articulation of the two notions may shed some light on marginal or neglected works. It may also question the dialectical relationship between modern and anti-modern, between avant-garde and rear-guard, between insistent innovations and archaisms, acknowledged or disguised.
  • Conference: "Trauma as cultural palimpsests: (post)communism against the background of comparative modernities, totalitarianisms, and (post)coloniality"

    Wednesday and Thursday, June 2-3, 2016. Wrocław, Poland. The trauma inflicted on societies under communist regimes and post- traumatic symptoms manifesting themselves across the whole spectrum of public discourses remains one of the most painfully under-researched problems in the study of Central and East European (CEE) cultures. The conference aims to investigate the multiple forms of totalitarian trauma and of the (post-)traumatic transition period in the region. The assessment of the totalitarian pasts has been the object of divisive and partial political debates, themselves, at times, no more than post-traumatic symptoms at the discursive level. The conference aims to investigate the seriality of trauma in the recent history of CEE (from ghettos to gulags to globalization, from Holocaust to communist and postcommunist mass killings, from concentration camps to immigration camps etc.), as well as the palimpsestic interplay between the different historical and experiential layers of cultural distress. We encourage potential participants to propose inter-/trans-disciplinary approaches and to devise comparative frameworks which may accommodate trauma studies, transition studies, postdependence studies, postcommunist studies, and postcolonial studies. We welcome transhistorical and transregional accounts of massive traumas of the 20th century in CEE and elsewhere, such as the extermination of the Armenians in the Ottoman Turkey in 1915, the Holocaust and Nazi extermination policies in WW2, the Indian Partition, the Balkan War, or the Rwandan genocide, to name but a few. Attention may be given to the ideological foundation of the breakthroughs of 1989/1991, including the role, contribution and importance of oppositional socio-cultural movements and the emigration (for instance, the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, the Polish October of 1956, the (post)communism against the background of comparative modernities, totalitarianisms, and (post)coloniality, intellectual movements of the 1960s generation in USSR, the Prague Spring, 1968 in Poland (with the ensuing mass eviction of the Polish citizens of Jewish nationality under the umbrella slogan of purging the Party from the Zionist element), the strikes of Polish workers in December of 1970 and June of 1976, Helsinki Accords of 1975, “Solidarity” [“Solidarność”], the announcement of glasnost and perestroika in the USSR in 1985, the Polish Round Table Talks in 1989, the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and so on). Click here for more information.
  • Deadline for Abstracts: Mnemonics 2016, “"The Other Side of Memory: Forgetting, Denial, Repression”"

    Wednesday through Friday, June 2-4, 2016. University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign). The fifth Mnemonics: Network for Memory Studies summer school will take place from June 2-4, 2016 on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and will be hosted by the Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies (HGMS). The theme of the 2016 event will be “The Other Side of Memory: Forgetting, Denial, Repression.” Our keynote speakers will be Berber Bevernage (Ghent), Jodi A. Byrd (Illinois), and Françoise Vergès (Paris). Submissions are open to all graduate students interested in memory studies. Mnemonics is an international collaborative effort for graduate education in the interdisciplinary field of memory studies. Each year a different partner institution hosts a summer school for select students on a particular theme pertinent to the study of cultural memory. Panels of scholarly presentations by graduate students will be supplemented by professionalization workshops, cultural events, and opportunities for informal socializing. Three distinguished keynote lecturers will present new work and will engage with participants. Partners from the different campuses affiliated with Mnemonics will also be on site and will help in responding to and mentoring graduate students. Click here to visit the website and obtain complete conference information.
  • Conference: “Statehood and its Discontents: Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia"

    Wednesday through Friday, June 15-17, 2016. Vilnius, Lithuania. In the post-Cold War era territorial borders have been continuously contested during the wars in Chechnya, the Caucasus, and more recently Ukraine. The conflict in Crimea and Eastern Ukraine has brought the questions of statehood and sovereignty again to the forefront of popular, political, and scholarly debates. This conference explores historical and contemporary challenges to statehood and emergence of alternative sovereignty and governance regimes. The potential topics include, but are not limited to: hybrid warfare, financial sovereignty, radical politics, nationalism, supranationalism, terrorism, secessionism, migration and displacement, memory and identity. This conference explores historical and contemporary challenges to statehood and emergence of alternative sovereignty and governance regimes. We extend the definition of “sovereignty” to “actualities of relations within ways of life” (Caroline Humphrey 2008), alternative forms of authority and legitimacy beyond the ones sanctioned by the state and international institutions. The potential topics include, but are not limited to: hybrid warfare, financial sovereignty, radical politics, nationalism, supranationalism, terrorism, secessionism, migration and displacement, borders and borderlands, memory and identity.
  • PIASA's 74th Annual Conference

    Thursday, June 16 through Saturday, June 18, 2016. Washington, DC. PIASA has organized annual conferences since 1942. Their main purpose is to convene experts from the Polish-American community working in various disciplines of the humanities, arts, and sciences and to highlight their latest research and accomplishments. The conference offers multiple presentations and panels in both plenary and thematic sessions as well as a banquet and cultural and networking events.
  • Ellipsis Across Borders Conference 2016

    Monday and Tuesday, June 20-21, 2016. University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). This conference is organized as part of the project Experimental Morphosyntax of South Slavic Languages, where agreement patterns are studied with a uniform methodology in six locations across the Western Balkans (in former Yugoslavia). This project has both a scientific and social agenda. On one side, it aims to investigate First and Last conjunct agreement in South Slavic languages and thus contribute to the currently debated topic (Bošković 2009, Marušič et al. 2015) which revolves around the need for clearer descriptions of the data. On the other side, the project aims to propagate psycholinguistic studies of South Slavic languages through cooperation between linguists across the borders of the former Yugoslavia.
  • Conference: Other Europes: Migrations, Translations, Transformations

    Thursday, June 23 through Saturday, June 25, 2016. Düsseldorf, Germany. Europe today bears little resemblance to the Europe at the center of humanities curricula, a construction of the continent that endures despite numerous critiques of Eurocentrism and that governs the way literature and culture are studied in much of the world. Large-scale immigration from parts of the world traditionally regarded as Europe’s other and the end of a Cold War, which drew a geographic distinction between one Europe and its (European) other, have not only rendered this traditional Europe obsolete but also raised the question whether it ever existed, whether Europe has not always been other to itself. In a Europe increasingly concerned with migration and its outcomes, what processes of rethinking are taking place that are not turned away from the rest of the world but cognizant of the worlds within Europe? How should Europe be positioned productively in new formations of national, comparative, and world literary study? Other Europes will examine how European identities have been conceived in the past and present; how European literature has been produced and circulated over time; and how large-scale immigration to and mobility within Europe as well as the post-1989 redrawing of the European map have changed these practices. What are the historical precedents for current developments? What are the theoretical paradigms in which these precedents can be mobilized for our present? Does this inquiry proceed differently in the United States and Europe? The conference represents a laboratory for addressing the politics of language and translation in literature and literary and cultural scholarship. To what extent has English become a lingua franca of literary and cultural scholarship? What are the gains and losses entailed in this development, and how have recent language and literature programs been revised to contest the dominance of English? How do these revisions differ in Europe and in other parts of the world? And how does the current dominance of English compare with the earlier dominance of Latin or French? This conference brings together an international group of scholars and engages the paradigms in and through which they work. It seeks to develop ways of thinking that emerge from and address Europe’s evolving political, economic, historical, and philosophical role in a world of ever-shifting migrations, translations, and transformations.
  • 2016 ASEEES-MAG Summer Convention

    Sunday through Tuesday, June 26-28, 2016. Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv, Ukraine). The summer convention's theme is “Images of the Other” - construction and definition of the 'Other', instrumental use and abuse of the ‘Other’ in politics, cultural and social practices; the role of ethnic, cultural, social and gender stereotypes; representations of the ‘Other’ in memory politics, art, public discourse and media; and scholarship regarding the ‘Other’ as a social construct. ASEEES and MAG invite papers;and panel proposals, related to the theme, understood in the broadest possible sense. The 2016 ASEEES-MAG Summer Convention will take place at the Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv, Ukraine. The conference program will begin in early afternoon of Sun, June 26 and continue through the evening of Tue, June 28; you may arrive on Sat, June 25; we plan to schedule a city tour on the morning of Sun, June 26. The program will feature approximately 80-100 panels including about 300 presentations, and there will also be a supplementary program including a plenary, receptions, cultural program, and a keynote speaker.
  • Conference: The 10th Joint Conference of Bulgarian and North American Scholars, "Beyond the Borders"

    Sunday through Thursday, June 26-30, 2016. Sofia, Bulgaria. For more than forty years the tradition of Bulgarian-American academic dialogs has been carried on by the Council for Bulgarian Studies Abroad at the Bulgarian Academy of Science and the Bulgarian Studies Association. The first conference was in 1973 in Madison, WI, followed by conferences in Varna (1978), Boston (1982), Smoljan (1987), Pittsburgh (1994), Blagoevgrad (1999), Columbus, OH (2003), Varna (2008), and Eugene, OR (2012). It is Sofia’s turn to host the 2016 Bulgarian-Northern American conference in the field of Bulgarian Studies. The topic of this conference, “Beyond the Borders”, invites various perceptions of “borders” (disciplinary, historical, cultural, national, etc.) and their interpretation as liminal spaces of distancing, interaction and transformation.
  • Auschwitz Trip with Eva Mozes Kor

    Saturday, July 9 through Sunday, July 17, 2016. "Since 2005, I have led over 500 people from 36 states, seven countries, and four continents to Auschwitz. You can read all the books in the world about the camp, but for me, it is important that you experience the place where I survived the medical experiments of Nazi doctors. When you experience it, then you can teach by feeling it. That's very important. I hope you will join me on this unique opportunity from July 9-17, 2016." - Eva Mozes Kor.

    Why should you consider an educational tour to Auschwitz with survivor Eva Kor?
    • Perhaps you have had the inclination to visit Auschwitz and learn from that tragic and historic site.
    • Perhaps you have felt a passion for studying the Holocaust.
    • Perhaps you are fascinated by the story of Eva Kor and the twins of Auschwitz.
    • Perhaps you are seeking a trip that is meaningful and different from all other trips.
    • Perhaps you are seeking to make lifelong connections with interesting people from all walks of life.
    • Perhaps you want to be part of history!

    CANDLES does offer limited scholarship opportunities to individuals who may need financial assistance.
  • Conference: The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration, "Rethinking Forced Migration and Displacement: Theory, Policy, and Praxis"

    Tuesday, July 12 through Friday, July 15, 2016. Adam Mickiewicz University (Poznan, Poland). The 16th conference of IASFM will take place on July 12-15, 2016 at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland. It will be hosted by the Centre for Migration Studies, the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, and the Faculty of Law and Public Administration. This is the first time that IASFM members will gather in Central Europe. The setting for the 16th IASFM conference is especially important as we watch the most recent refugee crisis unfold in Europe, including in countries that historically were refugee-producing spaces and now have to provide durable solutions for forced migrants fleeing armed conflicts and asking for refuge in Europe. These developments constitute a significant opportunity to rethink and redefine forced migration. Existing concepts and definitions are rooted in historical transformations–political, legal and social—that led to refugee movements post-World War II and during the Cold War, but are they appropriate for the diversity and complexity of the 21st century forced migration? International responses to recent conflicts in Syria and Ukraine have resulted in a heated public debate about who belongs in Europe and who does not. However, similar debates about whether refugees should be accepted or not are also taking place elsewhere in the world. Therefore, it is time to engage in discussion involving researchers and practitioners on when, how and why forced migrants have “the right to have rights”, to quote Hannah Arendt. The answers to these extremely sensitive political problems should be the subject of deep analysis involving social scientists, legal scholars, historians, and representatives of humanitarian organizations, policy makers, and when possible refugees. Such interdisciplinary perspectives will give the participants of the IASFM 16 the opportunity to develop a deeper reflection on forced migration concepts, definitions, and issues from historical and contemporary as well as regional and global perspectives. Themes include:
    • Who is a refugee? Old concepts, new realities
    • Citizenship, nationhood, and forced migration: Ideologies and policies of inclusion and exclusion
    • From refugee to refuge: The history and evolution of forced migration in East and Central Europe
    • Forced movements in the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean: Humanitarianism, human rights or human security?’
    • Regional responses to forced migration: The importance of local context — economic, social, and cultural — in crafting policy responses
    • UNHCR and IOM: Collaboration potential and pitfalls
    • Towards durable solutions for refugees, internally displaced, trafficked victims, and other forced migrants: Beyond immediate assistance and protection
    • State fragility and displacement: Concepts, realities, and the rule of law
    • Researching forced migration: Engagements, methodologies, and ethics
    • The power of imaginaries: Demonization and celebration of forced migration in words and images
    • Gender and sexualities: Protection challenges and possibilities
    • The long journey home: Return and reintegration
    • The struggle of belonging: Forming and reforming social identities of young refugees and asylum seekers
    • Climate change and displacement
  • Application Deadline (Russian citizens): Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships

    Friday, July 15, 2016. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to scholars from Russia and Ukraine to conduct research for six months in the fields of the humanities and social sciences. Preference is given to applicants whose research informs discussion of key public policy issues, enhances development of scholarship in the former Soviet Union, and fosters communication between the world of scholarship and the world of public affairs. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a particular need to be in Washington, D.C. The Wilson Center devotes significant attention to the exploration of broad thematic areas. Primary themes are: 1) governance, including such issues as the key features of the development of democratic institutions, democratic society, civil society, and citizen participation; 2) the U.S. role in the world and issues of partnership and leadership; and 3) key long-term future challenges confronting the U.S. and the world. Research in these areas is particularly encouraged. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to researchers and lecturers from academic and higher educational institutions and research centers who are actively involved in academic and research work. Eligible candidates include scholars and researchers who have at least two years postdoctoral (post-Kandidat) academic and research experience.
  • Early Proposal Deadline: 11th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Science

    Tuesday, August 2 through Thursday, August 4, 2016. Imperial College London (UK). "We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, virtual lightning talks, virtual posters, or colloquia addressing one of the following themes: Social and Community Studies; Civic and Political Studies; Cultural Studies; Global Studies; Environmental Studies; Organizational Studies; Educational Studies; Communication. Special Focus for 2016: 'An Age and its Ends: Social Science in the Era of the Anthropocene.'"
  • Conference: The 18th Nordic Migration Conference

    Thursday and Friday, August 11-12, 2016. Oslo, Norway. Global inequalities between countries and regions in terms of income, security, rights, and living conditions are today driving increasing numbers of people into crossing international borders in search of personal safety, economic opportunities and better future prospects. At the same time, social inequality is sharply on the rise within societies across the globe, as traditional structures of work and welfare are rearranged and/or dismantled. In an increasingly globalized world, boundaries of class, nationality, ethnicity, gender and legal statuses are intersecting in new ways, giving rise to changing and new dimensions of inequality within and between both migrant sending and migrant receiving societies. In this conference we wish to explore the diverse links between international migration and social inequality, in a Nordic, European and global context. We invite scholars from across disciplinary boundaries to engage in a discussion of how these changes can be conceptualized and studied, from a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives. Contributions are welcomed that reflect on how economic, political, cultural and social factors in origin and destination countries affect migration and shape diverse societies. We welcome papers which discuss how issues such as global inequalities, states policies, legal frameworks, media discourses and cultural boundaries shape the dynamics of migration and migrants’ everyday experiences.
  • 15th Conference of the International Network of Philosophers of Education

    Wednesday, August 17 through Saturday, August 20, 2016. Warsaw, Poland. The International Network of Philosophers of Education is to be held from August 17-20, 2016, in Warsaw, Poland. The main theme of the conference is “Philosophy as Translation and the Understanding of Other Cultures”, and philosophical papers reflecting on education in relation to the following sub-themes are welcome: border crossing, immigrancy and home; global economies and global justice; translation, untranslatability and the (mis)understanding of other cultures; the internationalization of higher education; policy borrowing and transfer; cosmopolitanism, patriotism and global citizenship; crossing philosophical divides; changing identities, personal and cultural.
  • Application Deadline: Faculty Domestic Conference Travel Grants (REEI/Mellon Endowment)

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016. Applications for funding of faculty travel to conferences in North America will be evaluated and awards made twice a year. Grants will not exceed $400, and faculty are encouraged to combine REEI funds with other IU sources. Only regular Russian & East European Institute affiliated faculty are eligible for support. Please contact REEI for information on becoming a faculty affiliate.
  • Conference: Central Europe and Colonialism: Migrations, Knowledges, Perspectives, Commodities

    Wednesday, September 21 through Friday, September 23, 2016. Wrocław, Poland. Central Europe has not yet been an object of keener interest in (post)colonial studies. However, not only did large numbers of Central Europeans migrate to the (former) colonial world, but Central Europeans also provided personnel to occupy, administer and police colonial empires,and reflected on colonial experiences at the levels of high and popular culture. Even if largely excluded from colonial politics at an international level, Central Europeans played an important role in generating new discourses based on data gathered in the colonial contact zone. Publications on exotic worlds circulated widely in Central Europe and inspired new conceptions of world history, world literature, and cosmopolitanism, in conjunction with new concepts of human nature (esp. a division of humanity in races) and ecology, with wide ranging consequences for world history.
  • Conference: “Vladimir Nabokov and the Fictions of Memory

    Thursday and Friday, September 22-23, 2016. University Of Social Sciences and Humanities (Warsaw, Poland). The University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland would like to invite proposals for presentations at an international conference devoted to the problem of memory in the works of Vladimir Nabokov. The conference will take place on 22-23 September 2016 in Warsaw. Almost 40 years after Nabokov’s death his texts continue to function as literary Fabergé eggs in which scholars keep finding hidden surprises and previously overlooked details. As Nabokov wrote in Conclusive Evidence, “the unravelling of a riddle is the purest and most basic act of the human mind.” However, readers and critics are divided on the issue of whether Nabokov is a postmodern riddle-maker enjoying the game itself without enabling the player to reach the ultimate solution, or whether the riddles are solvable by a reader astute enough to follow all the sophisticated patterns and allusions which point to Nabokov’s metaphysical convictions. One of the greatest riddles of Nabokov’s art is memory. From his very first poems and his first novel Mary to the unfinished manuscript of The Original of Laura, Nabokov’s writings abound in characters haunted by their past. This preoccupation is not simply a feature of loss and nostalgia characteristic of emigrant experience in general, but an attempt to examine the mechanisms which control the functions of human consciousness. While Nabokov explores his own remembrances, transferring his experiences to the characters of his fictions, it is never entirely clear how much of what is being recalled is in fact a construct of the imagination. Memory becomes an obsession for many of Nabokov’s heroes, who may often be described as mnemonic deviants, their crimes resulting from a falsified perception of reality which they constantly filter through the lenses of the past. Conversely, there are characters ennobled by their devotion to every fleeting detail of their existence, whether past or present. What is the function of memory in Nabokov’s texts? Is Nabokov really interested in objectively recalling the past or would it be more apt to say that he artfully constructs remembrance in order to deal with trauma, loss and disappointment? To what extent is the past reshaped through literary models and intertextual props? Does the past control us, as in Freud’s theories, detested and summarily dismissed by Nabokov, or is it possible to control the workings of memory and manipulate it in literary discourse?

    The languages of the conference are English and Russian.
  • Conference: 11th Slavic Linguistics Society Annual Meeting

    Friday through Sunday, September 23-25, 2016. University of Toronto (Canada). The Slavic Linguistics Society (SLS) is a professional organization devoted to the systematic and scholarly study of the Slavic languages. The organization brings together academics from Europe and North America (and elsewhere) through an annual conference that alternates between North American and European institutions, a mailing list, and other activities. It seeks to promote dialogue across different sub-disciplines of linguistics and theoretical frameworks. Membership in the Slavic Linguistics Society is open to anyone, regardless of academic rank or employment. We particularly encourage graduate students to join (there is a reduced student membership fee!), and to become involved with the activities of the organization. Please see the SLS website or the conference website for more details.
  • 1st International Conference on “Europe in Discourse: Identity, Diversity, Borders”

    Friday, September 23 through Sunday, September 25, 2016. Athens, Greece. The Conference seeks to examine issues in the ongoing construction of European identity, including notions of diversity and (physical and symbolic) borders. It will focus on critical investigations that draw on discourse theory or bottom-up textual analysis to investigate these topics from the following perspectives:

    • historical, to explore the determinants which have been used to support a collective European identity;
    • geopolitical, to understand the importance of space and its role in the European edifice;
    • ideological/discursive, to investigate, synchronically and diachronically, key concepts that have informed EU practices of inclusion and exclusion.

    Methodologically, the Conference will highlight discourse as a major practice that both shapes and reflects European identity.

    The Conference welcomes contributions that investigate the role that key European Union texts have played in forging, maintaining or challenging European identities. The conference will thus highlight identity not as a static concept but as a construct that is continually negotiated and re-written in multiple discourses.

    In addition to attracting contributions from discourse analysts and linguists, the Conference hopes to bring together leading scholars and researchers from a broad range of other fields, including history, European studies, cultural theory, media studies, sociology, political science, economics, and ethnology.
  • Application Deadline (Ukrainian citizens): Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships

    Saturday, October 15, 2016. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to scholars from Russia and Ukraine to conduct research for six months in the fields of the humanities and social sciences. Preference is given to applicants whose research informs discussion of key public policy issues, enhances development of scholarship in the former Soviet Union, and fosters communication between the world of scholarship and the world of public affairs. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a particular need to be in Washington, D.C. The Wilson Center devotes significant attention to the exploration of broad thematic areas. Primary themes are: 1) governance, including such issues as the key features of the development of democratic institutions, democratic society, civil society, and citizen participation; 2) the U.S. role in the world and issues of partnership and leadership; and 3) key long-term future challenges confronting the U.S. and the world. Research in these areas is particularly encouraged. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to researchers and lecturers from academic and higher educational institutions and research centers who are actively involved in academic and research work. Eligible candidates include scholars and researchers who have at least two years postdoctoral (post-Kandidat) academic and research experience.
  • Conference: "Crime and Punishment at 150"

    Thursday through Saturday, October 20-22, 2016. University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada). The publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866 was a watershed moment in the history of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Dostoevsky’s novel perennially hovers near the top of lists of “Best Books of All Time.” Harold Bloom summed up the work’s enduring mastery and appeal, observing that, “Crime and Punishment remains the best of all murder stories, a century and a third after its publication. We have to read it — though it is harrowing — because, like Shakespeare, it alters our consciousness.” In the twenty first century, media and technology advances have transformed the reading experience and the ways readers relate to texts. Most students in literature classrooms are now digital natives, many reading on e-devices, some even on smart phones. In the age of the “spoiler alert” our reading experience seems to have changed beyond all recognition, yet in some ways the possibilities of new reading communities opened up by social media allow us to replicate the kinds of institutional communities which arose around nineteenth-century Russian periodicals. Rethinking the ways in which we contextualize, teach, and interpret Dostoevsky’s novel will help make it more accessible to a new generation of readers.

    “Crime and Punishment at 150” will celebrate the novel’s sesquicentenary by bringing together teachers, scholars, students, translators, artists, and readers to discuss Dostoevsky in the digital age. The conference will include a keynote by Carol Apollonio, a screening of the new film Crime and Punishment (Apocalypse Films, 2015) with post-film discussion with its director, Andrew O’Keefe, and a video conference with a linked Crime and Punishment panel at the University of Bristol, among other events. Confirmed participants include Brian Armstrong, Elena Baraban, Alexander Burry, Deborah Martinsen, Louise McReynolds, Robin Feuer Miller, Megan Swift, and William Mills Todd, III.

    This event is co-organized by Katherine Bowers and Kate Holland, and supported by the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies (UBC), Green College (UBC), and the North American Dostoevsky Society.

  • Conference: ASEEES 2016 Annual Convention

    Thursday through Sunday, November 17-20, 2016. Washington, DC. One of the core activities of the Association is the annual convention. Held in the fall, the convention takes place each year in a different city and is generally hosted by one of the Association's regional affiliates. This international forum makes possible a broad exchange of information and ideas, stimulating further work and sustaining the intellectual vitality of the field.

    2016 Convention Theme: "Global Conversations"
  • Conference: “A Hundred Years of Ostranenie: an International Conference"

    Thursday through Saturday, December 15-17, 2016. University of Erfurt (Germany). A century ago, in 1916, a young student named Viktor Shklovsky self-published his precocious essay-cum-manifesto “Art as Device”. In it, he coined a term which became crucial in literary studies, and important in the study of cinema and visual art: ostranenie. Also known as “defamiliarization”, “estrangement”, “enstrangement”, “making strange” and “foregrounding” in English, and – causing confusion with Brecht’s concept – as “Verfremdung” in German, ostranenie is about rendering the usual extraordinary and thus making the reader (or viewer) perceive it anew. Or is it? The way Shklovsky uses the term in “Art as Device” is ambiguous enough; if we also consider his later and lesser-known works as well as the scholarly legacy of ostranenie, we arrive at an array of meanings worthy of a fundamental investigation, thus our suggestion to make this subject the topic of a conference. The subfields may include, but are not restricted to: translating the terminology of ostranenie; ostranenie in world literature; forms and functions of ostranenie; ostranenie, cognition and emotion; ostranenie, Russianness and the East; ostranenie, rhetoric and irony; ostranenie, diversion and entertainment; ostranenie and deconstruction; ostranenie and Romanticism; ostranenie, war, and terror; literary sources of ostranenie discussed by Shklovsky (Sterne, Tolstoy etc.); the media of ostranenie (visual arts, film, music and mediality in general). Keynote speaker will be the noted scholar of Russian Formalism Aage A. Hansen-Löve.
  • Proposal Deadline: Russia's Great War & Revolution, 1914-1922, "“Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine”

    Wednesday, Februrary 1, 2017. "Russia's Great War and Revolution, 1914-1922" (RGWR) is a decade-long, international, multidisciplinary effort generating new scholarly research focusing on Eurasia's "continuum of crisis" at the dawn of the twentieth century. The project's core participants comprise an international group of more than forty distinguished scholars. Since 2008 RGWR editors have been recruiting and selecting essays from scholars, academics, and exceptional graduate students from around the globe for publication and dissemination in a series of edited volumes being produced by Slavica Publishers. To date, the two volumes addressing "Culture" and "The Empire and Nationalism at War” and the first book of the third volume “Home Front” have been published. Three additional “Home Front” books will appear by mid-2106. RGWR Project Team members are interested in producing a stand-alone volume on "Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine" (STEEM) and seek to identify individuals willing to contribute an original essay to the collection. Essays may involve any aspect of the history/culture of STEEM (broadly construed) across Russia and Eurasia between c. 1914-1922. Younger scholars, including recent ABDs, are particularly encouraged to participate. Non-native English-speaking colleagues are welcome to submit their essays in their native language. Deadline for the delivery of initial essay drafts is: 1 February 2017. Following the process of peer-review, revision, and editing the final volume is expected to appear by November 2018. Please see the RGWR website for more project details. Those interested in participating the project should contact Dr. Scott W. Palmer at: sw-palmer@wiu.edu.
  • Peer Reviewers Needed for the Winter issue of Slovo

    Ongoing. As part of the editorial process for the forthcoming Winter issue of Slovo – an interdisciplinary academic journal published at the Slavonic Department of UCL – we are looking for peer reviewers for some short articles. It would involve reading the article and briefly summarizing your thoughts on whether it makes a good contribution to CEE scholarship. For the current issue, the themes are:
    • Early Soviet culture (specifically, filmography on Alexander Medvedkin);
    • The politics surrounding the 2008 war between Russia and Georgia;
    • Political institutions in Russia (specially, regional-centre relations in the Yeltsin era);
    • Concepts of the nation in Central Europe (specifically, in Serbian literature through David Albahari)
    In order to peer review these articles, you do not need to have expertise in the specific topic – only a knowledge of the broader areas in which they are based. Becoming involved with this issue would be an excellent way of alerting to future employers of your academic credentials. Please email slovo@ssees.ucl.ac.uk for further information, and indicating which of the fields you would be interested in reviewing.
  • Open Call for Papers and Reviews: Symposia: The Journal of Religion

    Ongoing. The editorial team of Symposia: The Journal of Religion announces that we have moved to an open call for papers. We will accept paper submission on a rolling basis, and will publish issues bi-annually. Please submit your papers when they are ready! Symposia is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal for the academic study of religion. Its primary focus is on the phenomenon called “religion,” as explored through multiple approaches including those of anthropology, philosophy, sociology, and history. Symposia encourages authors to question and critique the limits and boundaries of disciplinary knowledge, by critiquing categories central to the approaches of each in order to yield new reflections and fresh perspectives on religious phenomena and the study of religion in general. The theme for Volume 8 is “Rites of Passage.” Religions traffic in the business of moving peoples from one stage of life to the next. Whether in terms of coming-of-age ceremonies, or the transition from life to death, religious rituals and their concomitant philosophical reflections are capable of compartmentalizing an entire life into distinct stages. However, certain rituals that inaugurate people into new forms of life are not available to all others, indiscriminately. As for example in the case of shamanic initiations, initiates display some characteristics that, from the perspective of religious leaders, single them out for this activity. Nor are the temporal limits of the ritual initiation always clear, as in some narratival constructions with clear beginnings, middles, and endings. We invite, in addition to the general and open call for papers, papers that address issues surrounding liminality, transition, rites of passage, and initiation. Articles with a maximum of 25 pages will be considered in both French and English. Submissions are made online. Book reviews should be a maximum of 1000 words of any academic publication relevant to the study of religion and released within the last two years in order to be published. We particularly welcome books that deal with issues related to the theme for this issue, “Rites of Passage.” If you are interested in doing a book review, please email Ian Brown at ianphillip.brown@mail.utoronto.ca with the name of the author, book and publisher.
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