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Indiana University Bloomington

Richard Nash

Richard Nash

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Professor

Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1986

I am interested in British Literature and Culture in the Long Eighteenth Century, with a special interest in Literature and Science, concentrating on the Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century. My last (Yahoo) book was on the figure of the Wild Man in Eighteenth-Century England; my current (Houyhnhnm) project focuses on the origins of the thoroughbred racehorse and what it means to invent an animal. Both projects allow me to explore Nature/Culture hybridity and the origins of Modernity. Emerging from this recent project has been both an increasing interest in the mediating work of Early Modern Georgic in the context of AgriCultural Studies, and the ways in which Karen Barad's agential realism may offer theoretical tools for re-situating a "non-Modern" historical reconsideration of modernity.


Research Interests

18c British Literature and Culture; Literature and Science; Animality and Animal Studies; Early 18c Satire and Fiction


Selected Publications (click images for more information)

Books:

Wild Enlightenment: The Borders of Human Identity in the Eighteenth CenturyWild Enlightenment: The Borders of Human Identity in the Eighteenth Century. Charlottesville, Va.: University Press of Virginia, 2003. (Winner, Walker Cowen Prize, University Press of Virginia)

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Book Review - Eighteenth Century Studies >>

Thoroughbred: Cultural Metaphor and the Invention of an Animal (in progress).

Ecological Entanglements in Eighteenth-Century Verse (in progress).

Shaking the Foundations: A Revisionist Account of the First Thoroughbreds (Crossover Non-Fiction, in progress)

Configurations 14.3/15.1, 2006 (co-editor, Journal special double issue): "Thinking With Animals."

John Craige's "Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology." Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, 1991.

Selected Articles and Essays:

"Sporting with Kings," The Cambridge Companion to Horseracing, ed. Rebecca Cassidy (19pp.). Forthcoming, Cambridge University Press.

"'Beware a Bastard Breed': Notes Toward a Revisionist History of the Thoroughbred Racehorse" (29pp.). Forthcoming in Renaissance Horses, edd. Peter Edwards and Elspeth Graham, from Brill, 2011

"Joy and Pity: Reading Animal Bodies in Late Eighteenth-Century Culture," Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, 52, no. 1 (2011): 47-67.

"Speciesism and Early Modern Studies" (co-author), Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, 52, no. 1 (2011): 87-106.

"Animal Studies and the Ecologies of Post Humanism," Routledge Companion to Literature and Science, ed. Bruce Clarke and Manuela Rossini, London and New York, 2011: 253-63.

"Noble Brutes: How Eastern Horses Transformed English Culture" (Review) Eighteenth-Century Studies, 43, no. 3 (2010): 405-407.

"The Book that Wrote an Animal," Producing the Eighteenth-Century Book: Writers and Publishers in England, 1650-1800 Ed. by Laura L. Runge and Pat Rogers (University of Delaware Press, 2009): 117-34.

“Nomenclature and the Other Animal,” Humans and Other Animals in Eighteenth-Century British Culture: Representation, Hybridity, Ethics, ed. Frank Palmeri (Ashgate, 2006).

“‘Honest English Breed:’ The Thoroughbred as Cultural Metaphor,” The Culture of the Horse: Status, Discipline, and Identity in the Early Modern World, ed. Karen Raber and Treva Tucker (Palgrave, 2004): 245-72.

“Did Swift Write It cannot Rain, but it Pours?” Swift Studies, 17 (2002): 44-58.

"Sorrels, Bays, and Dapple Greys," Swift Studies, 15 (2000): 110-15.

"Immaculate Mothers and Celibate Fathers: Where are we Going and Where have we Been?" Playing Dolly: Technological Formations, Fantasies and Fictions of Assisted Reproduction, ed. E. Ann Kaplan and Susan Squier (Rutgers UP, 1999): 220-31.

"Gorilla Rhetoric: Family Values in the Mountains," Symploke 4:1-2 (1996): 95-133.


Select Honors and Awards

President, Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (2010-)
British Academy Fellowship, York University (2005)
Mellon Fellowship, Huntington Library (2005)
Walker Cowen Book Prize, University Press of Virginia (2003)


About Me

I am a member of the Center for Eighteenth Century Studies at Indiana University, a member of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, and a Past President of the Johnson Society of the Central Region (one of the founding Affiliate Societies of ASECS), and am currently President of the Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (companion site maintained at Johns Hopkins), the sponsoring organization of the journal, Configurations. I am also an active member of pedigree research group responsible for the website www.bloodlines.net; and I am available as a bloodstock consultant.